Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye With Jesse Thorn: Katie Couric, Audie Cornish, and Marc Maron

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Katie Couric
Guests: 
Marc Maron
Guests: 
Audie Cornish

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.

This week, we are bringing you interviews from Maximum Fun and the Columbia Journalism Review's new podcast, The Turnaround! Jesse Thorn sits down with some of our greatest living interviewers to bring you raw conversations about journalism, broadcasting, and what it's like to do what they do. You can subscribe now in Apple Podcasts, and catch the first episode on June 22nd!


Photo: Stephen Voss/NPR

Audie Cornish on authenticity in interviewing

Audie Cornish co-hosts NPR's All Things Considered. On NPR, she's often doing live interviews on breaking stories, interviewing reporters and newsbreakers who are on the scene after huge, sometimes really scary events took place. In a world where news moves so quickly, it's gotten easier and easier for hosts like Audie to slip up, maybe get a fact wrong. Honestly, the whole thing kind of terrifies me. But when Audie's covering a breaking story, she's careful, she's unflappable, and prepared.

This week, Jesse sits down with Audie to talk about how she got into broadcasting and the difference between working in broadcasting and print journalism. She tells us what it's like to work at such an established news institution like NPR, and why the word "dispassionate" does not describe her and her fellow broadcasters.

You can listen to Audie Cornish every morning on her show All Things Considered on your local NPR affiliate station.

Click here to listen to Jesse's interview with Audie Cornish!

Marc Maron on how his garage creates intimacy


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Marc Maron is a standup, an actor, and hosts of one of the biggest podcasts ever: WTF with Marc Maron. Recorded out of his garage in Highland Park, Los Angeles, Maron does long, kind of free form conversations with comedians, musicians, actors. He even got Barack Obama to come by. When you listen to WTF, though, you aren't just listening for the guest. Maron has a big personality, and it shows in his interviews - he's not rattling off a list of questions but instead having a really intimate and revealing conversation with his guests. It doesn't always go great, but it always reveals a lot about the guest, even if they aren't into it.

Marc and Jesse talk about what it's like recording his very popular show in his garage, his tactics for getting people to open up to him, and the differences between his stand up and podcast personas.

Marcs podcast WTF with Marc Maron comes out twice a week! He also has a book called Waiting for the Punch coming out this fall.

Click here to listen to Jesse's interview with Marc Maron!

Katie Couric on hosting a morning news show and asking the difficult questions

Katie Couric has worked in TV news for almost 40 years. She's hosted the Today Show, CBS Evening News, and is currently the Yahoo! Global News anchor. Name a super famous person, and she's probably talked with them; from presidents to prime ministers to first ladies and movie stars. Katie is also interested in talking to regular citizens, working on projects like Gender Revolution and Under The Gun. When she's not anchoring or filming documentaries, she's recording and hosting her own podcast.

Katie talks about what it's like to host a morning news show and about the questions that she's embarrassed to ask. Plus, she gives us tips on what to do if you want to get out of a conversation at a party.

Click here to listen to Jesse's interview with Katie Couric!

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Big Boi and Catherine O'Hara

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Bio Boi
Guests: 
Catherine O'Hara

[r] New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.

Hip Hop Icon Big Boi: Getting Familiar with Uncharted Territory

The rapper and producer Big Boi has sold over 50 million records as a solo artist and as half of the platinum-selling hip hop duo OutKast. The innovative Atlanta-based group broke out in the mid-1990s with "Rosa Parks" and "Elevators", then followed up with crossover pop hits like "The Way You Move" and "Bombs Over Baghdad".

OutKast found huge commercial success with an experimental brand of hip hop, eschewing old-school samples in favor of new sounds. Big Boi has been the more musically prolific member of the group. He's gone on to produce several solo albums and collaborate with artists across the music spectrum, from fellow ATL-based rapper Ludacris to funk-master George Clinton to the indie rock band Wavves.

Big Boi joins us to talk about the early days recording in a clay-walled basement, coming to terms with fame, and where to go musically when you've hit monumental commercial success.

Big Boi's new album Boomiverse is out on June 16th.

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Catherine O'Hara on Being Slightly, Perfectly Odd

Catherine O'Hara's work embodies a particularly special brand of comic absurdity. She helped launch SCTV alongside other burgeoning comedy greats like John Candy and Eugene Levy, quit the show, but still moved on to star in blockbuster comedies. She became spiritually possessed in Beetlejuice, played a memorable, anxiety-ridden mother to Macaulay Culkin in Home Alone, and became a critical part of Christopher Guest's ensemble mockumentaries, like Waiting for Guffman and Best in Show.

More recently, she's been in HBO's critically-acclaimed biopic Temple Grandin and Tim Burton's Frankenweenie, and CBC's Schitts Creek.

O'Hara talks to us about the difficulties of being a woman in the SCTV writers' room, creating memorable characters with her longtime friend and collaborator Eugene Levy, and her own secret comedic formula.

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The Outshot: Fast, Cheap, and Out Of Control

At first, Errol Morris's documentary Fast, Cheap & Out of Control looks like it's about four men and their professional occupations: a lion tamer, a topiarist, a roboticist, a scientist who studies naked mole rats. But the movie is about much more than just weird jobs.

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Kathryn Hahn and David Letterman biographer Jason Zinoman

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Kathryn Hahn
Guests: 
Jason Zinoman

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Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer / Stringer

Kathryn Hahn on her new Amazon series, I Love Dick

Kathryn Hahn is an actor and has been in comedy films like Step Brothers, the Anchorman movies, and a bunch more. She's also starred in the NBC series Crossing Jordan and was also on Parks and Recreation, playing Jennifer Barkley, the political consultant.

Lately, she's been working a lot with the writer and director Jill Soloway. She was in her 2013 film Afternoon Delight, she plays Raquel the rabbi on Amazon's Transparent, and now she's starring in another Amazon series called I Love Dick, based on the Chris Klaus book by the same name.

Hahn and Jesse talk about the inherently feminist space that I Love Dick inhabits, and the deeply complex character that Kathryn plays on the show. She talks about working with Jill Soloway on many of her most recent projects, and the special and deeply creative environment that Soloway creates on her sets.

You can catch Hahn in I Love Dick on Amazon now.

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Jason Zinoman on "The Last Giant of Late Night", David Letterman

Jason Zinoman is a writer and a critic covering comedy over at the New York Times. He also writes for Slate and Vanity Fair. He's got a new book out - it's called Letterman: The Last Giant of Late Night. More than a biography of David Letterman, it is about one of the funniest TV hosts of all time and why so many people are fascinated with him.

Jason and Jesse talk about the span of David Letterman's career, from parodying regional radio on his college radio station, to his time working as the weekend television weatherman, to his late night show segments that appealed to really basic comedic instincts in the audience (i.e. "Dropping Stuff off a 5 Story Tower" and "Stupid Pet Tricks" and "How many Guys in Spider-Man Suits Can Fit Into a Jamba Juice").

Jason's book Letterman: The Last Giant of Late Night is out now.

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The Outshot: Concrete the Superhero

Jesse tells us about Concrete, one of the saddest and most honest superhero comics he's ever read.

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Bullseye With Jesse Thorn: Carol Kane and Chris Fairbanks

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Bullseye
Guests: 
Carol Kane
Guests: 
Chris Fairbanks

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Photo: Jesse Thorn

Carol Kane on her childhood, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, and auditioning

Carol Kane is a veteran actress. She began her career in 1971 and landed some pretty heavy roles - one of her first films was in the Mike Nichols drama Carnal Knowledge. Later on, she'd work on other classics like Annie Hall and Dog Day Afternoon. She was even nominated for a best actress Oscar for her part in the 1975 film Hester Street.

She eventually found her home doing comedy, something she never expected she would do growing up. She appeared on Taxi as Simpka, the wife of Andy Kaufman's character on the show. She was in the Muppet Movie, The Princess Bride, Scrooged, and so many others. Her current project is Netflix's Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt where she plays Lilian, Kimmy's landlord.

She and Jesse talk about her childhood, and the special school she went to that allowed actors time to audition. They also talk about many of her projects over her expansive career- The Princess Bride, Taxi, and of course Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt. Plus, she tells Jesse that after all of these years, she still gets nervous auditioning.

Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt season 3 in it's entirety is on Netflix now!

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Chris Fairbanks live at MaxFunCon

Chris Fairbanks is a standup comedian, he's appeared on Conan O'Brien, Jimmy Kimmel Live and Comedy Central. Alongside April Richardson, he also hosts the tv show Almost Genius on TruTV. His standup is really unique. It is kind of improvised, really surreal, and contains lots of quick two line jokes.
Last year, we were lucky enough to host Chris at MaxFunCon, which is an annual gathering in the woods organized by Maximum Fun, and we've got a bit of his set from that show for you this week!

Check out Chris' album Fairbanks! which was released in 2010 and is an absolute classic. You can also still get tickets to MaxFunCon East which is happening this September in Pennsylvania.

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The Outshot: The Larry Sanders Show

Jesse tells us about the HBO metasitcom from the late 90's, The Larry Sanders Show.

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Bullseye With Jesse Thorn: Terry Crews and Amber Tamblyn

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Bullseye
Guests: 
Terry Crews
Guests: 
Amber Tamblyn

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Photo: Jesse Thorn

Terry Crews on addiction, physical fitness, and why he works so much

Terry Crews is the kind of performer that has his hand in all different facets of the entertainment industry. He's Andy Samberg's co-star on Brooklyn Nine Nine, and he played the president in Idiocracy. He was also the screaming muscle man in all those Old Spice ads. His latest role is in Sandy Wexler, the new Adam Sandler comedy on Netflix. But, before all that, Terry was a football player from Flint, Michigan - like not just high school and college - he played on four NFL teams over 5 years. He was picked by the LA Rams in the 11th round of the 1991 NFL Draft, and in 1996 he played his last season ever for the Eagles.

Terry and Jesse discuss football, and the culture that surrounds the player in training and on the field. They discuss what life was like for Terry after leaving the NFL, and how that time shaped his relationship to fitness. They also discuss his childhood, his relationship to success, and why he works so much.

You can find Terry's new movie Sandy Wexler on Netflix now.

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Photo: Ilya S. Savenok / Stringer

Amber Tamblyn on her new movie Paint It Black

Amber Tamblyn has had a really interesting career. She is the daughter of actor Russ Tamblyn and she appeared in her first ever movie when she was only 12 years old. She's landed roles on TV shows like Joan of Arcadia, General Hospital, Inside Amy Schumer, as well as playing the beloved Tibby character in the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants movies. Tamblyn is also a poet. She's had three books of poetry published, the latest of which, Dark Sparkler, came out a couple years ago and features photos by David Lynch. Now, Tamblyn has written and directed her first ever feature length film. It's called Paint it Black and is based on the Janet Fitch novel of the same name. It tells the story of Josie, whose boyfriend Michael dies suddenly before the film begins.

Amber and Jesse talk about what it was like to direct her first feature film, and the theme of death throughout much of her published works. They talk about what it was like to be a child actor, and the spark of creativity that becoming a new mother has given her.

Paint It Black is in theaters now, and don't forget to pick up a copy of Tamblyn's book of poetry Dark Sparkler.

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The Outshot: The Gap Band

Jesse tells us about the 1982 classic album, The Gap Band IV.

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Bullseye With Jesse Thorn: John Waters and Andy Kindler

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Bullseye
Guests: 
John Waters
Guests: 
Andy Kindler

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Photo: Jesse Thorn

John Waters on writing, death, and trigger warnings

John Waters is a director who hasn't made a movie in over a decade, and he doesn't really plan to make any more. He's directed some absolute classics like Pink Flamingos, Cry-Baby and probably most notably Hairspray. But even though he's not making movies he's keeping busy - he's done a ton of live performances, released a few compilation albums and he's a published author, too. He's written about half a dozen books, his latest is called Make Trouble. It's an illustrated transcript of a commencement speech he gave in 2015. He's also an actor - he played director William Castle in the latest season of FX's Feud, he even had a cameo in one of those Alvin and the Chipmunks movies.

This week, John and Jesse talk about how he keeps the motivation to work, even after he has achieved so much in his career. They talk about trigger warnings, and John tells Jesse why he was never interested in school.

His new book Make Trouble is available now.

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Photo: Jesse Thorn

Andy Kindler on comedy writing, hack stand-ups, and staying funny while angry

Andy Kindler is a stand up comedian. He's also kind of the ombudsman for comedy. Every year since 1996, Andy's taken the stage at the Just for Laughs Festival to give what he calls the State of the Industry speech. Andy gets in front of a giant crowd of stand-ups and industry types and basically puts them all on blast. And it's given Andy a reputation as being sort of a comic's comic. Of course, it's also really, really funny - it gets a huge crowd every year.

Andy and Jesse talk about the hardest part of giving that State of the Industry speech- staying funny while being angry. They also talk about hack comedians of the 1980's and 90's and racism in the industry. Plus, Andy blesses us with very accurate impressions of some of your favorite comics.

You can watch Coming To The Stage on Hulu now. And there are still tickets available for this years Just for Laughs Festival where you can see Andy deliver his State of the Industry speech.

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Photo: John Iacono/Sports Illustrated

The Outshot: Rickey Henderson

Jesse tells us about one of his favorite baseball players, Rickey Henderson.

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Moshe Kasher, Brother Ali, and Felicia Day

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Moshe Kasher
Guests: 
Brother Ali
Guests: 
Felicia Day

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Moshe Kasher on his new Comedy Central show Problematic

Moshe Kasher has been a stand-up for the last 16 years. You've seen him on The Tonight show with Jimmy Fallon, Conan, and Chelsea Lately.

Now, he's got his own TV show. Problematic with Moshe Kasher is on Comedy Central right now. Like a lot of shows nowadays it has a comedian taking on issues of the day, talking with newsmakers. He's explored cultural appropriation on the show, technology, and Islamophobia, to name a few. But there's something really intriguing in the show's format. He talks with experts and everyday people and the result is this really frank and insightful conversation.

Moshe also had a pretty rough childhood. He grew in Oakland and got kicked out of a bunch of schools and did hard drugs for a while. He talks about that in his autobiography, Kasher in the Rye.

Moshe and Jesse talk about the rough parts about growing up in the Bay Area. He is candid about what he is learning in the transition between doing stand-up and hosting a television show. Finally, he tells us why he thinks a diverse representation of disabled people is lacking in the media, and why he is so keen to take on controversial issues on his new show.

You can watch Moshe's new Comedy Central TV show Problematic Tuesdays at Midnight and his autobiography Kasher and the Rye is out now.

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Photo: Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images

Felicia Day on The Mighty Boosh

Felicia Day is a comedian, she's an actress, she's kind of a legend in the worlds of comedy and nerdy stuff. She had a recurring spot on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, worked with Wil Wheaton, she's also created and starred in her own web series called The Guild.

She tells us how with the weird British TV series The Mighty Boosh helped heal her with laughter, when she really needed help.

Felicia currently is starring in the anticipated reboot of Mystery Science Theater 3000 on Netflix.

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Photo: Daniel Yang

Brother Ali on his new album and why he's choosing beauty over resistance

Brother Ali is a rapper based out of Minnesota. He's part of the Rhymesayers collective - a label he shares with Aesop Rock, Dilated Peoples, and Atmosphere.

For the first part of his career, he focused a lot on making protest rap. His latest record is called All The Beauty In This Whole Life. And on it, he focuses on a lot more positive stuff. And he does it with a real honesty and openness at the same time. Ali talks about his faith a lot - he's been a Muslim since he was 15. He also talks about his albinism - and how having no pigment in his skin presented a ton of totally unique challenges growing up.

He and Jesse talk about what it was like growing up albino, and how that has affected his racial politics. He tells Jesse what it's like to have a black son in 2017, and why he's chosen to focus his music on love rather than protest in these tumultuous times.

His new album All The Beauty in This Whole Life is out now.

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The Outshot: In The Night Kitchen

Jesse recommends the kids book In The Night Kitchen for children, or adults, who need to remember why dreams are so important.

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: George Saunders, Chris Gethard, and DJ Jazzy Jeff

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
George Saunders
Guests: 
Chris Gethard
Guests: 
DJ Jazzy Jeff

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Photo: Jesse Thorn

Chris Gethard on mental health and the importance of failure

Chris Gethard hosted the The Chris Gethard Show for 6 years. It aired first on New York City public access, then later on the Fusion network. You might've also seen him on Broad City or Don't Think Twice, the Mike Birbiglia movie that came out last year.

Chris is also a standup. His latest special, which was produced with Judd Apatow, is called Career Suicide and is kind of a one man show. Career Suicide, specifically talks about alcoholism, depression, and death.

Chris and Jesse talk about his HBO special, and why he's looking forward to taking a break from talking about mental health issues.

Career Suicide premiere's May 6th on HBO.

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The Song That Changed My Life, with DJ Jazzy Jeff: Funkadelic's Knee Deep

Jeffrey Townes is a DJ, record producer and actor from Philadelphia. But you probably know him better as DJ Jazzy Jeff, the producer and collaborator to Will Smith's Fresh Prince. Growing up in Philly in the late 70s, Jazzy Jeff remembers the song that changed his life. It's Funkadelic's Knee Deep.

You can stream his new album Chasing Goosebumps now, and see him on tour this year.

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George Saunders on humor, death, and choosing positivity

Photo: Beowulf Sheehan / ZUMA Press

George Saunders is a writer. His short stories have appeared in the New Yorker, GQ, McSweeney's and more. His 2013 book, a short story collection called Tenth of December, was a finalist for a National Book Award. His latest is called Lincoln in the Bardo - it's his first novel, ever. A lot of his work is funny, but where his other stories focused on absurdity and consumerism, Lincoln in the Bardo goes back to the 19th century, it's almost historical fiction.

In his conversation with Jesse, George talks about his process for writing his first novel, and combating the urge to insert jokes into scenes that are too emotional. They talk about whether he's afraid of death, and about that time he was almost died in a plane crash.

You can find Saunders' new book Lincoln in the Bardo in stores and online now.

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The Outshot: Paul Simon's Graceland

Paul Simon's 1986 Graceland is the perfect record for middle age.

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Werner Herzog and Mount Eerie's Phil Elverum

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Bullseye
Guests: 
Werner Herzog
Guests: 
Phil Elverum

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Phil Elverum of Mount Eerie and The Microphones on his wife's death and creating music honoring that experience

First up: Phil Elverum. He's a recording artist and songwriter. Elverum's career dates back over 20 years, first as the Microphones and later Mt. Eerie. He's produced ambitious, beautiful records that mix genres like folk, noise, death metal, shoegaze and more. It sounds a little like we're listing off different bins in a record store, but it's really compelling stuff.

His albums have all gotten a lot of acclaim, not just because of the studio experimentation but because of the beautiful, kind of ephemeral lyrics he used to tackle big, existential questions.

On his latest record, A Crow Looked At Me, he abandons pretty much all of that. His wife, Geneviève, died of pancreatic cancer last summer.

Phil wrote and recorded the album in the room where she died, using instruments she owned. As an album it's raw, plainly spoken and kind of therapeutic. He talks about really specific moments - trips to the hospital, getting rid of old clothes, getting her mail still.

He talks to Jesse about death and dying, and how he processed thatloss through music. Plus, for a little levity, he talks about his high stakes gambling game: Wad Lord

Phil's new album A Crow Looked At Me is out now.

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Photo: Jesse Thorn

Werner Herzog on his new film Salt and Fire

From eating a shoe onstage to hauling a steamboat over a huge hill in the Amazon, German film director Werner Herzog is one of those public figures that has a kind of mythology to him him. But in Werner's case, a lot of it's true. He has had a career that spans more than 5 decades and dozens of awards, working both in documentaries and narrative films. He's known for Grizzly Man, Cave of Forgotten Dreams, Fitzcarraldo and Little Dieter Needs To Fly. He says that although he doesn't consider himself a workaholic, he has directed a film almost every year from the beginning of his career, with 3 being released in the last year alone.

Jesse and Werner talk about his new film starring Michael Shannon and Veronica Ferres and what it was like when he was shot during a routine interview with the BBC.

Werner's new films Salt and Fire and Queen of the Desert is out now.

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The Outshot: Broadcast News

Jesse tells us about his why the 1987 classic dramedy Broadcast News is his favorite James L. Brooks film.

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Bulleye With Jesse Thorn: Guy Branum

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Guy Branum
Guests: 
Emily Lordi

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Photo:Jesse Thorn

Guy Branum on his new tv show and the importance of being charming

Guy Branum is a comedian, writer, actor, podcaster, and now host of his own new TV show, Talk Show The Game Show. Before his career in media, he had his sights set on being a lawyer, completing a law degree and passing the bar exam before leaving that life behind. He realized he had an overwhelming passion for pop culture, and he began his career in stand-up. Eventually, he landed a writing and commentator position on Totally Biased with W. Kamau Bell, and is now a writer on The Mindy Project. He is the host of Bullseye's sister show and Maximum Fun's own Pop Rocket podcast.

In this extended interview, Guy tells Jesse about his new show and some of the challenges that came with creating it. He shares what it was like growing up gay in a farming town outside of Sacramento, his journey of coming out to his family and friends, and why he uses the word "charming" so often.

You can watch Guys show every Wednesday at 10/9c on truTV.


Photo: Spotify

Canonball: Donny Hathaway's Live

Academic and writer Emily Lordi makes the case for why Donny Hathaway's live album deserves to be added to the canon of classic music. She tells us why this 1972 record, largely made up of covers of other people's songs, is so essential to understanding the black artistic experience at the time.

If you want to know more about this album, Emily's 33 ⅓ book on the album is out now.

The Outshot: It's Not Crazy, It's Sports

Photo: ESPN

Jesse tells us why there is no better person to capture the crazy things athletes and fans do than the documentarian Errol Morris.

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