film

Matt Belknap on Juno

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If we've learned anything here, it's that when people don't like something, they will object to and complain about every choice made within that thing. On a perverse level, I kind of enjoy how the "Juno" soundtrack punishes the hipster viewer/listener for knowing so much obscure music. Whereas the rest of the world is oblivious to the songs' sources and can just take them at face value, the hipster will go crazy with every needle drop and become filled with the indignant rage of a villager whose homeland has been invaded and his family raped. I have no doubt that, to the learned music fan, the "Juno" soundtrack is a cloying, ham-handed appropriation of indie music that tries too hard and exposes the filmmakers as hopeless poseurs... but then again, there were probably die-hard folkies who felt the same way about "The Graduate."

Matt Belknap of Never Not Funny and aspecialthing.com sums up the discourse on Juno quite ably.

Podcast: Eric Lax on Woody Allen

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Show: 
Bullseye

Jesse interviews Eric Lax. Lax is the author of "Woody Allen: A Biography," "On Being Funny" and most recently "Conversations with Woody Allen." Since being assigned to profile Allen for the New York Times magazine almost forty years ago, Lax has followed the comedian and filmmaker's career, interviewing him regularly. We talk about Allen's life and enormous ouvre, from the great to, well... The Curse of the Jade Scorpion.

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You might also enjoy these past interview programs:
Shelley Berman & Mr. Wizard
Hollywood Outsiders: Rebel Filmmakers and Great Film Critics
Demetri Martin & H. Jon Benjamin (MP3)

The Pope and Michaelangelo from Monty Python

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Something is wrong with The Last Supper.

"Is it the disciples? Did I make them look too Jewish? I tried to make Judas look the most Jewish..."

via Kung Fu Grippe

Podcast: The Best Music & Movies of 2007 with the editors of The Onion's AV Club

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Show: 
Bullseye


This one's a podcast exclusive -- the best music and movies of the year for 2007. Managing editor Josh Modell runs down the music side, and Film Editor Scott Tobias runs down the world of film. You can find the full film list here, and the full music list here.

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You might also enjoy these past interview programs:
Satirist George Saunders
Artist/Writer/Filmmaker Miranda July
Comedian Dave Hill

Podcast: Burn to Shine with Brendan Canty

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Show: 
Bullseye


This week, we talk with Brendan Canty. He's best known as the drummer for the punk rock band Fugazi, but he's also made his name as a record and film producer. We talk about his high concept music DVD series "Burn to Shine." Each DVD features a group of bands representing a regional rock scene, each of which play a song in a house that's slated to be burned down by the fire department. Brendan says he hopes each DVD captures a moment in the music scene of a certain place.

We also talk about how Brendan feels about making a new career after 17 years with Fugazi, and about being a rock & roll dad.

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Podcast: Chris Elliott

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Show: 
Bullseye


Chris Elliott is an alternative comedy legend. He began his career as a runner on Late Night with David Letterman, before becoming an iconic writer/performer on that show. He turned his fame into a bizarre sitcom called Get A Life and a perhaps even stranger film called Cabin Boy. More recently, he's appeared in films like There's Something About Mary, Groundhog Day and Scary Movie and in many TV shows, including The King of Queens and Everybody Loves Raymond. He's now an author, with a new novel called "Into Hot Air: Mounting Mount Everest."

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You might also enjoy these past interview programs:
Satirist George Saunders
Artist/Writer/Filmmaker Miranda July
Comedian Dave Hill

Podcast: JJGo Ep. 46: Halloween Spooktacular

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This week on the show Jordan and Jesse talk with Adam Kempenaar from the podcast Filmspotting and we hear about Jesse's new dog - basically there aren't a lot of scary things.

THIS WEEK'S ACTION ITEMS:
* What was your worst holiday ever and why? Tell us the story!
* It's the semi-final of the battle of the animals. It's Hippo vs. Bear!

CONTINUING ACTION ITEMS:


* Review the show on iTunes.
* Do you have a dispute Judge John Hodgman can solve on a future broadcast? Email it to us! Put Judge John in the subject line.
* Have personal questions for Jesse and Jordan? Call 206-984-4FUN and tell us what they are!
* Does It Hold Up? JJGo's new action item!! Tell us about the things you liked in your youth that are still entertaining in 2007! Call 206-984-4FUN!
* Would you like to play Would You Rather with us on a future episode? Email us or give us a call at 206-984-4FUN.

Call 206-984-4FUN to share your thoughts on these ACTION ITEMS.

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Our theme music: "Love You" by The Free Design, courtesy of The Free Design and Light in the Attic Records

Podcast: Sarah Lamm, director of "Dr. Bronner's Magic Soapbox"

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Show: 
Bullseye


Sarah Lamm is the director of the documentary "Dr. Bronner's Magic Soapbox," which examines the Bronner family and their counter-culturally iconic soap. She talks about the original Dr. Bronner, who created his famous soap in a tenement apartment after being briefly committed to a mental institution. The soap's text-dense label includes wisdom from Ghandi, Jesus and Olympic champion Mark Spitz. Sarah also discusses the second and third generations of the family, who've built the soap into an international force and more recently into a leader in the field of sustainable business practices.

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You might also enjoy these past interview programs:
Goofaround Gang with Tim & Eric, Paul F. Tompkins and Will Franken
Baseball with Bill Lee and Tim & Eric
Joke Warfare with Terry Jones and Dino Stamatopoulos

Interview: Robert Jackson, The Art of the American Snapshot 1888 - 1978.

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The Art of the American Snapshot 1888 – 1978” is currently running in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, until 31st December 2007. The exhibition features photos from the collection of Robert E. Jackson from Seattle, one of the country’s premier snapshot collectors. I spoke to Robert about the exhibition and all things ‘snapshotty’ – here’s what he had to say.

EMcD: How would you define a snapshot?

RJ: The snapshot can be defined as a democratic photographic phenomena arising out of the technological advances in the mechanics of camera processing. This produced a product which allowed the amateur to take photos with some of the same degree of ease and sophistication as found in professional photography at a cost which was affordable. The act of taking a snapshot is personal response to a moment involving telling a story using the camera as a surrogate for memory.

EMcD: How did you go about accumulating these photographs over the years?

RJ: My interest in snapshots grew out of an earlier interest in paper ephemera. I liked the content of the snapshots--the tricks, the odd poses and costumes, the small jewel-like nature of the medium. And probably most importantly snapshots were inexpensive relative to other types of photographic mediums, and they were plentiful which meant I could build a collection with some ease. One can collect fingers obscuring the lens, photo emulsion mistakes, gay interest photographs, badly tinted photos, photos where faces have been scratched out, photos of pit bulls, photographer shadows, the notations on the backs of photos. Also this most democratic of photographic mediums could have only been built using the internet and most specifically Ebay which allowed me to network with dealers and be exposed to items from around the United States and often the world on a daily basis.

EMcD: You've assembled a huge array of photos spanning a 90 year period in American history. What themes does the exhibition explore?

RJ:The exhibition explores the creativity of the snapshooter and how cultural influences impacted the ways in which the photographer interacted with the times as well as with friends and family. The personal, intimate nature of the snapshot and the often voyeuristic impulses of the snapshooter are highlighted through the portrayal of sleeping photos throughout the time period. The issue of remembrance, narrative, and rituals within the snapshot genre are shown via the presentation, through the decades, of birthday cakes.

EMcD: What impact did the introduction of easily accessible photography have on life in America during the period examined?

RJ: It provided the general population an affordable means to create a narrative of their life. Their ability to record the world around them and to interact, via taking a picture, in the historical and familial events by which they were surrounded allowed for the preservation of a slice of American life which we now can experience and attempt to understand from a sociological and aesthetic vantage point.

EMcD: Since 1978 technology has improved dramatically and the way we now view images has totally changed. Does the fact that we now view many of our photos via computers and not captured as actual physical prints ruin the concept of the snapshot?

RJ: Technology has not necessarily improved in relation to the creation of the snapshot, but rather has changed, and via such change has impacted our way of thinking about the taking and making of a snapshot. Once the price decreases and the ease of taking and editing a snapshot increases, photos which don’t fit within the accepted canon of what a “good” snapshot should be are often eliminated (in that sense one could say something has been “ruined”). Thus the manner in which we interact with our snapshots, our memory, has changed. Snapshots are not viewed anymore as private documents, but rather are viewed as something to exhibit in the public sphere via websites such as Flickr.

As part of the exhibition, the documentary “Other People’s Pictures” will screen on November the 21st and 23rd at 1.00pm in the Gallery. The 53 minute piece tracks nine collectors as they hunt for images of people they do not know. Co-producer of the documentary Lorca Shepperd was a previous guest on TSOYA.
Listen to the interview with Lorca Shepperd


Jim Henson "Time Piece"

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A remarkable short from Jim Henson. Contains some elements that are kind nsfw, but not super nsfw.

via ze frank

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