film

Podthoughts by Ian Brill: "Filmspotting"

| 2 comments

In our regular feature Podthoughts, freelance journalist Ian Brill helps you navigate your way through the thousands of podcasts available on the internet. This week, he looks at the film criticism podcast Filmspotting.

When regular Filmspotting co-host Sam Van Hallgreen was out for a week it was The Onion AV Club’s Scott Tobias that sat in to discuss films with the podcast’s other host Adam Kempenaar. This choice for a substitute should inform you of the tone of this podcast. The hosts of Filmspotting have that same knack that the writers for the AV Club have for taking their knowledge and passion for pop culture and turning it into informative and typically entertaining content.

Van Hallgreen and Kempenaar’s discussions often reach the best type of criticism. The two aren’t giving “liked it/didn’t like it” reviews. Their analyses compliment a viewing of the film itself. A recent argument on Ocean’s 13 involved determining the film’s place in not just the “Ocean’s” series but in director Steven Soderbergh’s entire career. The critics paid careful attention to the acting styles and screenwriting of the film. The talk is always calm and intelligent, never colored by bias. One of the reasons to keep coming back to Filmspotting is to hear how Van Hallgreen and Kempenaar can be both in-depth and brief about a film. They can provide a review and still have time for plenty of other segments in each roughly hour long podcast.

Filmspotting is a rigidly structured podcast. Every entry for an episode on the website has it down to the time codes. There are one or two reviews, a look at new DVDs and gratitude for donations, Massacre Theatre (not a weekly tribute to Tobe Hooper but instead a segment where the hosts butcher a beloved screenplay), Polls and listener feedback, and then the Top 5 lists. They’ve also recently added “The Noir Marathon,” in which Von Hallgreen and Kempenaar dissect a classic like The Killers or Out of the Past. Occasionally a show will feature an interview with a filmmaker, such as a recent talk with A Might Heart director Michael Winterbottom. I was impressed how later in that same show one of the hosts talked about having a Filmspotting meet-up with fans. The podcast does a good job of straddling the line between journalistic professionalism and the looser, more fun feel of podcasting.

What keeps the show fresh is that, thanks to the hosts’ endless familiarity with film, these dependable segments can touch on virtually any subject. One episode can feature the hosts’ top five best films on music, then next week it can be top five best films on journalism. The fun of these lists is telling the other party how wrong they are, which is where the listener feedback comes in. These are the segment that best illustrate the main appeal of Filmspotting: the joy of being a movie geek.

Special Free Screening of The Ten in SF

| 1 comment

Our pals at SF Sketchfest and ThinkFilm are presenting a special FREE screening of David Wain's newest magnum opus, "The Ten" in San Francisco:

Tuesday, July 24
7:30 pm
Landmark’s Lumiere Theatre
1572 California Street, San Francisco.
To attend, you must RSVP to thetensf@yahoo.com. Be sure to give your full name and let us know if you will be bringing a guest. Please note the theatre will be slightly overbooked to ensure capacity; an RSVP will not guarantee you a seat.

For those of you who aren't in San Francisco, you can just watch the trailer above and drool. You can also listen to this interview with Wain on TSOYA last year.

Forbidden Love

| 1 comment

Via Boing Boing

Podcast: Bob Odenkirk

| 3 comments
Show: 
Bullseye


Bob Odenkirk has written for Saturday Night Live, and won an Emmy for his writing on The Ben Stiller Show. He co-created and starred in the sketch comedy series Mr. Show with Bob and David, and directed the films Melvin Goes to Dinner and Let's Go To Prison. He also directed the upcoming film The Brothers Solomon, which was written by and stars SNL's Will Forte, alongside Kristen Wiig and Will Arnett.

Odenkirk's latest project is "Derek and Simon," a series of shorts featuring comedians Derek Waters and Simon Helberg on Super Deluxe. Their casual, conversational tone is pierced by sometimes outrageous premises. Below is the first episode.

Please share your thoughts on this program on our forum!

Download This Show (MP3)
Subscribe in iTunes
Review the show in iTunes
Please Donate to Support the Show

Listen to This Week's Show


Please allow our low-bandwidth server a little time after you click "play"

Our intersititial music is provided by Dan Wally

You might also enjoy these shows:
Joketacular with Mr. Show writer/performer Brian Posehn
Goofaround Gang with Mr. Show writer/performer Paul F. Tompkins and Tim & Eric
Joke Warfare with Mr. Show writer Dino Stampatopoulos

Shrek 3 is coming!

| 2 comments

Have you heard about this great family film? If it weren't for Tim & Eric, I might have missed Shrek 3!

Further viewing:
Eric's Testimonial
Tim's Testimonial
Puppeteer David Lieve Hart's Testimonial

Podcast: Jordan, Jesse GO! Ep. 23: You're the reason that daddy left.

| 0 comments


In this week's Jordan Jesse GO!, we discuss vacations and more.

Introduction
Jesse and Jordan are kick-starting summer at the beach! Rutger Hauer called in sick, so please send us a get well card or picture for him. Also: Jordan's slang update.
Eros
Jesse and Jordan discuss the bumper sticker that listener SmartBunny designed. Jordan is concerned that everything devolves into eroticism.
Short Hair, Long Hair
A surprisingly emotional discussion of long and short hair.

Movies and So On

Jesse saw The TV Set, and really enjoyed it. Jordan saw Spiderman 3. Also, a listener calls in with a harrowing tale.
Pledge Break
May first through fifteenth is the MaxFun Drive. Donate.
Drinking Game

The final game is here on the forum. We want you to host one and report back.

Lyme Disease

A listener calls in because he thinks he might have Lyme disease. Turns out he totally does.

Outro

We hear a few more big moments calls.

ACTION ITEMS

* Donate to support MaximumFun.org
* Send us something nice for Rutger Hauer -- like a get well soon card.
* Host a JJGo drinking party.

LISTENER SONG

"Yr Polish Uncle" by The Reid Paley Trio from Approximate Hellhound

CONTINUING ACTION ITEMS:

* Review the show on iTunes.
* Do you have a dispute Judge John Hodgman can solve on a future broadcast? Email it to us! Put Judge John in the subject line.
* Have personal questions for Jesse and Jordan? Call 206-984-4FUN and tell us what they are!
* Would you like to play Would You Rather with us on a future episode? Email us or give us a call at 206-984-4FUN.

Call 206-984-4FUN to share your thoughts on these ACTION ITEMS.

Subscribe in iTunes

Podcast Feed

Discuss the show on the forum

Download This Episode

Hear This Episode Now


Our theme music: "Love You" by The Free Design, courtesy of The Free Design and Light in the Attic Records

Podcast: TSOYA Classic: No F***ing Eagles

| 1 comment
Show: 
Bullseye


We continue our journey into The Sound of Young America's vast audio archive with this program from The Sound of Young America Classics.

Our guests: We talk first with the founders of Lebowskifest, an annual celebration of all things Big Lebowski. Aherents call themselves "Achievers," and flock to the events, typically held in bowling alleys.

We also talk with Seth Greenland. He's the author of the novel "The Bones," which satirizes Hollywood and the world of comedy.

Please share your thoughts on the show in the comments section!

Download This Week's Show
Subscribe to TSOYA Classic in iTunes
Please Donate to Support the Show

Listen to This Week's Show


The Comedy of the Schlub

| 0 comments

Sharon Waxman, a former TSOYA guest and a reporter with a great talent for finding the angle, has an interesting piece on the Judd Apatow ouvre in the Times today.

The question she introduces to the debate is an important one, and she quotes Mike White (the man behind such wonderful films as "School of Rock" and "The Good Girl"):

“To me, I definitely stand in the corner of wanting to give voice to the bullied, and not the bully. Here’s where comedy is catharsis for people who are picked on,” he said.

“There’s a strain in ‘Knocked Up’ where you sort of feel like something’s changed a little bit,” he continued. “My sense of it is that because those guys are idiosyncratic-looking, their perception is that they’re still the underdogs. But there is something about the spirit of the thing, that comes under the guise of comedy, where — it’s weird. At some point it starts feeling like comedy of the bullies, rather than the bullied.”

Apatow writes to Waxman:

“I think there is a nerd’s fantasy involved in many of these films. We all wish that somebody would take the time to get to know us, and love us, warts and all.”

He added: “I always wanted to be given a shot. And the sick part is this: No matter how many shots I get, I never completely lose the feeling of inadequacy that makes me wish I would get a chance to prove myself.”

The line between nerd-schlub and bully-schlub is a fine one. I think a great illustration might be the films of Adam Sandler, where while the protagonist is often a weird outsider type, and invariably a man-child, there's little attention paid to the real feelings that are so central to "The 40-Year-Old Virgin." Often in Sandler's films, acting like an emotionally stunted jerk is almost the reason for his triumph.

I haven't yet seen "Knocked Up," and I'm very excited to, but this will give me something to consider between now and then.

Jerry Lewis on Pauline Kael & critics...

| 2 comments

Dick Cavett talks with Jerry Lewis about being an auteur and dealing with critics. Including how much he loves Pauline Kael, a "dirty old broad" who'd never said anything good about him, ever. Great stuff.

La Haine on DVD

| 0 comments

I first saw La Haine (Hate) in the theatre, when I was in high school. With the exception of Style Wars, I think it may be the best "hip-hop film" I've ever seen. It tracks three friends in the suburban ghettos of Paris, and anticipates some of the racial and class unrest that we've seen there in the past few years. It's about hip-hop, and youthful alienation, and race, and all that stuff, and is very powerful.

It came out yesterday on Criterion DVD, and I think you should, at the very least, rent it.

Above: one of the film's most remarkable shots, which apparently was achieved using a remote-control helicopter.

Syndicate content