upstream color

Switchblade Sisters Episode 77: 'The Peanut Butter Solution' with 'Pet Sematary' Actor and 'The Girlfriend Experience' Co-creator Amy Seimetz

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Guests: 
Amy Seimetz

The Peanut Butter Solution

Amy Seimetz started out writing, directing, and acting in short films and made her feature debut in a pair of films, Black Dragon Canyon and the indie cult hit Wristcutters: A Love Story. She appeared in films such as Gabi on the Roof in July, Tiny Furniture, You're Next, and The Myth of the American Sleepover before directing her own feature debut, Sun Don't Shine in 2012. Amy went on to co-create and executive produce the critically acclaimed Starz series The Girlfriend Experience. In 2018, Amy directed two episodes of the acclaimed FX series Atlanta and subsequently signed a first look television production development deal with the network. But yes, she continued acting throughout that time as well, and you’ve seen her in Upstream Color, Alien: Covenant, The Killing, Stranger Things, Wild Nights with Emily, and Pet Sematary.

But the movie that Amy chose to discuss has nothing to do with any of that! She's chosen The Peanut Butter Solution, a Canadian children's movie from the eighties that most people thought they dreamed up. April and Amy dissect the crazy plot and how something this unconventional could be made for children. Amy discusses working on her debut Sun Don't Shine, collaborating with Hiro Murai and Donald Glover on Atlanta, and being directed by Madeleine Olnek on Wild Nights with Emily. Plus, they ponder the lessons on creative freedom that can be learned from children's films and how it's sometimes best to not think logically.

You can check out Pet Sematary and Wild Nights with Emily in theaters now.

If you haven't seen it yet, go watch The Peanut Butter Solution.

With April Wolfe and Amy Seimetz.

You can let us know what you think of Switchblade Sisters on Twitter or Facebook.

Or email us at switchbladesisters@maximumfun.org.

Produced by Casey O'Brien and Laura Swisher for MaximumFun.org.

Wham Bam Pow Ep. 15 - Violence in Movies and Upstream Color

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Show: 
Wham Bam Pow

This week, we have a discussion about violence in movies -- how do current events affect our consumption and enjoyment of action flicks? Plus, we put on our thinking caps and dive into Shane Carruth's sci-fi stumper Upstream Color. What IS this movie ABOUT?

Follow us on Twitter! Cameron is @cameronesposito, Rhea is @rheabutcher and Ricky is @rickycarmona. Discuss the show using the hashtag #WhamBamPow!

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Shane Carruth of Upstream Color and Rodney Ascher of Room 237

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Shane Carruth
Guests: 
Rodney Ascher
Guests: 
Kumail Nanjiani
Guests: 
Emily V. Gordon

New to Bullseye? Subscribe in iTunes or the RSS feed. You can also find and share all of our segments on our Soundcloud page.


Video Games with The Indoor Kids: Ms. Splosion Man and BioShock Infinite

Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon, co-hosts of video game podcast The Indoor Kids, join us to share their favorite new releases. Their first pick is Ms. Splosion Man, an imaginative platformer newly available on iOS. (Think Super Mario meets spontaneous self-combustion.) For a lengthier experience, check out BioShock Infinite, which (literally) takes the first BioShock to even greater heights.

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Upstream Color Director Shane Carruth on Creating Cryptic Cinema

Nearly ten years have passed since the release of writer/director Shane Carruth's first low-budget film, a complex time travel movie called Primer. Film fans are still obsessed with teasing out the intricacies of the story, about a time-travel machine and the men who engineered the machine. But within that story, there are emotional and ethical struggles that keep the audience riveted -- a quality that's become a hallmark of Carruth's small but powerful filmography.

Carruth wrote, directed, starred and composed all of the music for Primer, and he had the same all-consuming roles in his new film, Upstream Color. The movie is just as difficult to explain as his first. Upstream Color's two lead characters seem to have a shared experience of bodily manipulation, and cling to that sameness because they have nothing else. The movie delves deeply into identity and loss, and comes through with a powerful emotional experience.

Shane Carruth joins us to talk about the upsides and downsides of independent filmmaking, why plot summary doesn't always get to a movie's heart, and the best James Bond movie that will never be made.

Upstream Color is in select theaters nationwide. The film is available on DVD, Blu-Ray, and on demand on May 7.

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Comedy: Kyle Kinane Goes on a Fast Food Adventure

Kyle Kinane had a problem. He was craving fast food, but he'd had a little too much to drink. But he found a solution. It involved a little bit of ingenuity, a wallet's worth of cash, and a very patient cab driver.

This clip comes from Kyle Kinane's latest special, Whiskey Icarus, which is available as a digital download or a CD/DVD. He'll be performing at MaxFunCon 2013 in late May.

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Director Rodney Ascher Opens The Door On Room 237

Stanley Kubrick's movie The Shining made a huge cultural impression. It's a classic horror movie about the psychological tolls of isolation, the dissolution of a family, the Holocaust, and how Kubrick helped fake the moon landing.

Wait a second. The Holocaust? Moon landing? Yep. The new documentary Room 237 features increasingly eye-widening theories about the hidden subtexts of The Shining. Movies often inspire intense debate over authorial intent, but Kubrick's known perfectionism and deliberate filmmaking often take this discussion to another level.

Room 237's director Rodney Ascher sits down with us to discuss some of the film's more creative theories, as well as whether or not there's such a thing as too much interpretation.

Room 237 is out now in select theaters nationwide and available on video on-demand.

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The Outshot: The Grand Tour by George Jones

Pop music is usually for young people – what better audience is there for short, simple, high-energy music? But what does pop music sound like when it grows up? To answer that question, Jesse takes a look at a song by George Jones, called The Grand Tour.

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