rock

EP90: Prince Special

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Show: 
Heat Rocks
Guests: 
Anil Dash
Guests: 
Meshell Ndegeocello
Guests: 
Illa J

The Albums: 

Hard to believe but Prince's landmark album Purple Rain turns 35 years this week (and the Purple One himself would have just celebrated his 61st birthday last week). In honor of these milestones and the fact that Prince is one of Heat Rocks' Triple Crown winners (i.e. his albums have been featured three times so far), we decided to offer you a "Best of Prince" episode that splices together highlights from our previous three Prince eps:

Show Tracklisting (all songs by Prince unless indicated otherwise):

  • When You Were Mine
  • Dirty Mind
  • Controversy
  • Sister
  • Partyup
  • Sister
  • Dirty Mind
  • When You Were Mine
  • Head
  • D'Angelo: She's Always In My Hair
  • Gotta Broken Heart Again
  • D.M.S.R.
  • Little Red Corvette
  • Let's Pretend We're Married
  • 1999
  • Little Red Corvette
  • Lady Cab Driver
  • All The Critics Love U in New York
  • Lady Cab Driver
  • Let's Go Crazy
  • For You
  • When Doves Cry
  • I Would Die 4 U
  • Let's Go Crazy
  • Computer Blue
  • The Beautiful Ones
  • When Doves Cry
  • Purple Rain
  • Housequake
  • Let's Go Crazy

Shout out to our Producer Supreme, Christian Duenas, for doing the edit work on this episode and if you enjoyed the highlights, be sure to download and listen to the entire episodes!

EP88: Guy Branum on Ani DiFranco's "Plastic Little Castle" (1998)

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Show: 
Heat Rocks
Guests: 
Guy Branum

The Album: Ani DiFranco: Little Plastic Castle (1998)
Ani DiFranco has never been a pop star by conventional measure but Little Plastic Castle was her dealing with the costs of stardom within her niche of alternative pop/rock world. The result is what's considered one of her best albums ever — it ended up being her best-selling at the very least — one where she tries to work through what happens when public scrutiny and fan indignity begin to feel invasive and you wonder what it's all for. For DiFranco though, she reminds us: she's got better things to do than survive.  
Little Plastic Castle was the pick of our guest, comedian Guy Branum who, until very recently, was the host of the Maximum Fun pop culture panel podcast Pop Rocket (alas, recently cancelled, RIP!). Pre-Heat Rocks, Oliver was on Pop Rocket for two years and got to see, first hand, Guy's pop polymath skills in action. Taped earlier in the spring, live in front of an audience as part of the Voyager Institute series, the three of us discussed DiFranco's album within the context of Lilith Fair-era female artists, the politics of queer authenticity and how her invocation of cherry bombs probably doesn't refer to firecrackers.  
More on Guy Branum

More on Little Plastic Castle

Show Tracklisting (all songs from Little Plastic Castle unless indicated otherwise):

  • Little Plastic Castle
  • Swan Dive
  • Ani DiFranco: 32 Flavors
  • Two Little Girls
  • Glass House
  • Fuel
  • Swan Dive
  • Gravel
  • Independence Day
  • Dizraeli: Bomb Tesco
  • Pulse

Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find there
If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!

Heat Rocks EP81: Bhi Bhiman on Sly and the Family Stone's "Stand!" (1969)

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Show: 
Heat Rocks
Guests: 
Bhi Bhiman

The Album: Sly and the Family Stone: Stand! (1969)
When San Francisco’s Sylvester Stewart and his Family Stone released Stand! in the spring of the 1969, it further cemented the group’s reputation as the definitive pop act of the era, whose multiracial makeup mirrored the band’s multi-musical fluency in rock, pop, soul and funk. They captured the post-summer of love optimism of the times in songs like “Everyday People” and “You Can Make It If You Try” and though those good times wouldn’t last in the years to follow, for that brief, shining moment, Stand! thrust Sly and the Family Stone into the spotlight as avatars for a national feeling of possibility and positivity. Can it be it was all so simple then? 
Stand! was the pick of guest Bhi Bhiman, the singer/songwriter from Los Angeles (by way of St. Louis). Armed with an eclectic set of influences, Bhiman's dabbled in everything from songwriting with The Coup's Boots Riley to collaborating with comedian Keegan-Michael Key to releasing his most recent album, 2019's Peace of Mind, as a podcast. Together, we discuss how Stand! reflected the soon-to-be-dashed optimism of its time, how the Family Stone doesn't get enough credit for Sly's sound and ponder how Ike and Tina Turner managed to rip off "Sing a Simple Song" without catching heat. 
More on Bhi Bhiman

More on Stand!

Show Tracklisting (all songs from Stand! unless indicated otherwise):

  • Soul Clappin' II
  • Jimi Hendrix: We Gotta Live Together
  • Sing A Simple Song
  • Stand!
  • Tremaine Hawkins: Change
  • Stand!
  • Sex Machine
  • Don't Call Me N****, Whitey
  • Sing A Simple Song
  • You Can Make It If You Try
  • Bold Soul Sister
  • Everyday People
  • I Want To Take You Higher

If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!

EP71: Lindsay Zoladz on Bryan Ferry's "These Foolish Things" (1973)

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Show: 
Heat Rocks
Guests: 
Lindsay Zoladz

The Album: Bryan Ferry, These Foolish Things (1973)
Bryan Ferry first came to notice in the early 1970s thanks to the art rock group, Roxy Music, that he helped form. Most other artists would have focused their energies on their budding, hit band but Ferry, throughout his career, has never been one to be like "most other artists." Even as Roxy Music was blowing up, Ferry used time between those albums to record his own solo works and though his voice might bridge the two, his solo debut album, These Foolish Things was unlikely to be confused for a Roxy Music project. 
Ferry, at heart, is a crooner and so it's only fitting that this album would inspired by his eclectic interpretations of different rock, pop and soul standards, including everything from Erma Franklin's "Piece of My Heart," to The Rolling Stones' "Sympathy for the Devil" to the Beach Boys' "Don't Worry Baby." We talk about an artist trying to "make a song their own" whenever we discuss covers and it's hard to argue that when it comes to Ferry here, he's putting his own, distinct stamp on these hits. 
These Foolish Things came to us by way of our guest, music critic Lindsay Zoladz, who's spent the last ten years stocking up clips for everyone from Pitchfork to New York Magazine to The Ringer, where she's been a staff writer for the last several years (alongside the likes of previous Heat Rocks' guests, Shea Serrano and Chris Ryan). Zoladz shared with us how she discovered this particular album (especially as someone who wasn't even born in the 1970s), what she hears in Ferry's interpretations and whether or not he lives up to the title of being a "bobby dazzler." 
More on Lindsay Zoladz

More on These Foolish Things

Show Tracklisting (all songs from These Foolish Things unless indicated otherwise):

  • These Foolish Things
  • A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall
  • Baby I Don't Care
  • It's My Party
  • Piece of My Heart
  • The Tracks of My Tears
  • Sam Cooke: These Foolish Things
  • James Brown: These Foolish Things
  • River of Salt
  • Lesley Gore: It's My Party
  • It's My Party
  • Loving You Is Sweeter Than Ever
  • Don't Worry Baby

Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find on there.
If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!

EP53: Chris Ryan on the Rolling Stones' "Exile on Main Street" (1972)

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Show: 
Heat Rocks
Guests: 
Chris Ryan

The Album: The Rolling Stones: Exile On Main Street (1972)

In 1972, The Rolling Stones were at the peak of their success...and excess. In order to flee British tax collectors, Keith, Mick and the crew fled to France where, over the course of many months - and a ton of drugs - the group pieced together what would become an epic double album. It would take Mick dragging the tapes to Hollywood to complete production but once finished, Exile On Main Street would become embrace as one of the group's greatest albums and for some, it marked the end of the group's "golden era," in terms of how it blended together rock, soul, and blues together in a mish-mash of styles that still invoke awe - and controversy - today.

The album pick came to us via Chris Ryan, executive editor at The Ringer, where he contributes or hosts a number of podcasts himself, including the pop culture show, The Watch, and the site's movie discussion show, The Rewatchables. Before that, Chris was a long-time music writer, based out of New York, and one of the funniest and smartest critics Oliver's ever met.

More on Chris Ryan

More on Exile On Main Street

Show Tracklisting (all songs from Exile On Main Street unless indicated otherwise):

  • Rocks Off
  • Casino Boogie
  • Ventilator Blues
  • Sweet Black Angel
  • Shake Your Hips
  • Sweet Virginia
  • Tumbling Dice
  • Turd on the Run
  • Rocks Off
  • Happy
  • The Rolling Stones: Miss You

Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find on there
If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!

EP50: Sidibe on Joni Mitchell's "Court and Spark" (1974)

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Show: 
Heat Rocks
Guests: 
Sidibe

The Album: Joni Mitchell: Court and Spark (1973)

In 1973, Joni Mitchell was in the midst of one of the greatest pop music runs of the decade. By that time, the Canadian-turned-temporary-Angelino had already put out Ladies of the Canyon, Blue and For the Roses, establishing her as one of the very few women that the rock establishment of the era would deign to even recognize. But with Court & Spark, Mitchell showcased her abilities beyond just the folk-rock world by minting a pop album that would become a defining statement of the time and her most successful LP of all time.

To talk about Court & Spark, we had in another transplant to L.A.: singer/songwriter Sidibe. Since moving out here 10 years ago, she's steadily raised her profile, especially after the release of her 2014 EPs, Metaphysical and Soul Siren. Alongside the likes of Anita Baker and Sade, Joni has been a longtime influence and inspiration on Sidibe and during our convo, we discussed Mitchell's vocal gifts, her jazz-rock collaborations on Court & Spark plus a tangential discussions on how bagging groceries might help one get discovered.

More on Sidibe

More on Court & Spark

Show Tracklisting (all songs from Court and Spark unless indicated otherwise):

  • Help Me
  • Sidibe: Unreachable
  • People's Parties
  • The Same Situation
  • Just Like This Train
  • Help Me
  • Joni Mitchell: Sweet Sucker Dance
  • Twisted
  • Raised on Robbery
  • Help Me
  • Sidibe: Love is Stronger Than Pride

Here is the Spotify playlist of as many songs as we can find on there

If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!

EP47: Summer Spectacular feat. Quetzal

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Show: 
Heat Rocks
Guests: 
Quetzal

The Albums: 

We wanted to dedicate an episode to talking about the music of summer, easily the one season that people have the deepest sonic associations with. To that aim, we invited the two founding members of L.A.'s Quetzal, Martha Gonzalez and Quetzal Flores. Since 1992, the group has melded the son jarocho tradition into all manners of other genres, resulting in seven albums (and counting), including last year's The Eternal Getdown
Together, each of our quartet got to pick an album that we associate with the summer and as you see above, we covered a whirlwind of styles and eras that bring up all manners of thoughts and feelings for us. Summer love may be fleeting but it lingers, always. 
More on Quetzal

Show Tracklisting:

  • Quetzal: Fig Pulp 
  • Alé Kumá: Vola Pajarito 
  • Alé Kumá: Por Que Me Pega 
  • Alé Kumá: Oiaymelo 
  • Mary J Blige: Love No Limit 
  • Mary J Blige: Reminisce 
  • Mary J Blige: Sweet Thing 
  • Mary J Blige: What's the 411 
  • Mary J Blige: I'll Be There for You/You're All I Need to Get By 
  • The Smiths: Sheila Take a Bow 
  • The Smiths: Shoplifters of the World Unite 
  • The Smiths: Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now 
  • Kendrick Lamar: Hood Politics 
  • Kendrick Lamar: Alright 
  • Kendrick Lamar: King Kunta 
  • Kendrick Lamar: These Walls 
  • Kendrick Lamar: i 

Here is the Spotify playlist of as many of the songs above as we can find on there.

If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!

Story Break #65: Rock, Paper, Scissors

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Show: 
Story Break

We take the internationally beloved game of rock, paper, scissors and make a movie out of it!

Black Roots in Music & Comics (911, Timeline of White Folks Appropriating Black Music, Black Comic Characters, Janet Appreciation Day, Justin Timberlake, Queen Nefertiti, Scandal, Today Show)

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Show: 
Minority Korner

How did you spend Janet Appreciation Day (AKA Super Bowl LII)? We took a knee in support of Colin Kaepernick, and protesting Justin Timberlake's (Mr. King of Appropriation) performance after his participation of 'nipplegate' back in 2014, aiding in Ms. Jackson's dethroning, and riding his wave of white male privilege unscathed to the land of further success. Scandal seems to be showing some Janet love this week in it’s hot mess of a final season. Are you watching James’ “Auntie’s” (Angela Bassett's) show 9-1-1? Nnekay has a huge correction for the Today Show, and their unveiling facts about Queen Nefertiti, and who she really was. Note: she did not look like Gladys the soccer mom. Also King Tut was probably a bubble boy. Inspired by Justin Timberlake’s Super Bowl performance, James takes us on a magical journey through time exploring a timeline of white folks appropriating Black music, why this has been occurring for over a century, and American music’s roots in African culture. Nnekay continues her discussion from last week exploring Black comic characters you should know! Hold onto your butts as we continue our celebration of Black culture! 
 
Timeline of White Folks Appropriating Black Music
http://www.ebony.com/entertainment-culture/fade-to-white-black-music-whi...
http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/dr-lisa-tomlinson/black-music-exploitation_...
https://medium.com/@IRahmanJones/white-people-blues-music-and-the-proble...
https://morningsidereview.org/essay/black-rhythm-white-power/
https://morningsidereview.org/essay/black-rhythm-white-power/
https://blavity.com/confused-heres-a-breakdown-of-what-the-cultural-appr...
https://www.bet.com/music/2017/05/08/pop-stars-use-black-artists-twitter...
https://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/why-sister-rosetta-tharpe-be...
https://www.rockhall.com/inductees/chuck-berry
http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/music_box/2016/10/race_rock_and_the_r...
http://www.slate.com/articles/arts/music_box/2016/10/race_rock_and_the_r...

 
Black Comic Characters: 
https://www.cbr.com/26-of-the-greatest-black-characters-in-comic-book-hi...
https://www.buzzfeed.com/danielkibblesmith/sweet-christmas?utm_term=.sev...
 
Twitter: @minoritykorner
Email: minoritykorner@gmail.com
Like Us On Facebook: Minority Korner
 
Minority Korner Store:
https://teespring.com/minority-korner-t-shirt#pid=369&cid=6513&sid=front
 
Watch the Black Panther Red Carpet Coverage with co-host James:
http://marvel.com/blackpantherlive

Heat Rocks EP17: Vernon Reid on Jimi Hendrix's "Band of Gypsys" (1970)

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Show: 
Heat Rocks
Guests: 
Vernon Reid

The album: Jimi Hendrix: Band of Gypsys (1970)

Vernon Reid is one of rock's greatest guitarists, having rising to stardom in the 1980s as a member of Living Colour. It's not surprising, therefore, that he'd choose an album by one of rock's other great guitarists: Jimi Hendrix and his final album, Band of Gypsys, recorded live at the Fillmore East and released in the spring of 1970. Reid gave us an amazing lesson into what exactly made Hendrix so brilliant, least of all on this album.

More on Jimi Hendrix's Band of Gypsys

More on Vernon Reid

Show Tracklisting (all songs from Band of Gypsys unless indicated otherwise):

  • Message of Love
  • Jimi Hendrix on The Dick Cavett Show
  • Jimi Hendrix: Star Spangled Banner
  • Jimi Hendrix: Are You Experienced?
  • Machine Gun
  • Power to Love/Power of Soul
  • Who Knows
  • Them Changes
  • Living Colour: Power of Soul
  • Jimi Hendrix: Stop

If you're not already subscribed to Heat Rocks in Apple Podcasts, do it here!

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