illustration

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Mark Alan Stamaty

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: New York Review Comics

Cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty on 'MacDoodle Street,' 'Who Needs Donuts?,' and more

We're thrilled to share our conversation with cartoonist Mark Alan Stamaty. We're huge fans of his children's book – "Who Needs Donuts?" Mark's wonderfully illustrated book tells the story of a kid in a cowboy suit who's bored with his family. He hitches up his wagon and heads out for the big city in search of donuts. After a wild adventure he realizes there are things far greater than donuts. It's a charming and hilarious book for kids. And, trust us, adults will love it, too!

Mark Alan Stamaty got his start working at a handful of New York papers, with a few regular comic strips. There's Washingtoon, a political strip. A few regular comics in the New York Review of Books. And MacDoodle Street, which he published for the Village Voice in the late '70s.

MacDoodle Street was just released as an anthology collection. In MacDoodle Street, you see New York kind of the way a kid from outside the city might: a wild, bizarre and kind of fantastic place. Overwhelming, but endlessly interesting and stimulating. This new edition features a brand-new, twenty-page autobiographical comic by Stamaty on why the short-lived but treasured MacDoodle Street never returned to the Village Voice. It's a unique, funny, and poignant look at the struggles and joys of being an artist.

We're thrilled to share this conversation with Mark Alan Stamaty. He'll give us the scoop on his new anthology collection, and how his childhood influenced his work. Both of his parents had the same profession as him. Plus, where he gets the silly ideas for his stories and illustrations. Rhinos on the subway wearing fancy hats! Shark-shaped cars!

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Maura Tierney and Michael Kupperman

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Maura Tierney
Guests: 
Michael Kupperman

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Emma McIntyre / Getty Images

Maura Tierney on her career and her starring role in the new film 'Beautiful Boy'

Maura Tierney is probably best known for her time on the hit drama "ER." She played Abby Lockhart. Her character was introverted, sarcastic and a bit self-destructive, but when it came to her patients she always showed warmth and compassion. Her role was complex and nuanced, which is uncommon for a soap opera. She's currently on the Showtime series "The Affair."

She also starred on "Newsradio" as Lisa, the ambitious reporter and producer. Lisa was the kind of person who kept a tight schedule and always had her eyes on her life-plan. She was also the kind of person who could perform complex mathematical calculations in her head. Her character was incredibly intelligent, kind of an overachiever and at times very funny.

She's currently starring in an acclaimed drama: "Beautiful Boy," which just hit theaters. It's a story about the difficult and frustrating nature of addiction. It stars Timothée Chalamet as Nic, a college age kid struggling with a drug habit. Maura plays Karen, Nic's step mom. "Beautiful Boy" is as unique as it is realistic: addiction is a complicated thing. It brings some people closer together, drives others away, it has ups and downs.

This week, we'll chat about these roles and look at the rest of her career, which spans several decades. Plus, she'll explain why she starred alongside Jerry Orbach in the 1991 film "Dead Women in Lingerie." We'll play a clip from the movie, and you can bet she shrieked in horror that we were able to dig that up.

Check out this interview on YouTube!


Photo: Simon and Schuster

Michael Kupperman on his new graphic memoir 'All The Answers'

Michael Kupperman is a cartoonist, writer, and he's one of our favorites at Bullseye. His comics have appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and Believer Magazine. A lot of his stuff is surreal, and a little silly. For his latest book he gets serious and very personal. In "All The Answers" he explores his father's time as a world famous TV Quiz Kid.

Back in the 40s and 50s, when people were still figuring out how television worked, there were "quiz shows." TV programs where hosts would ask contestants trivia questions, and if they kept answering right, they'd stay on the show. Michael's dad; Joel Kupperman, managed to stay on for almost a decade. And it all happened when he was a kid.

When he grew up, Joel pretty much left TV. And he didn't talk about it much, not even with his family. And when he did, it wasn't usually positive. Michael got the sense that this was a pretty dark chapter in his Dad's life. So Michael did some of his own research. He went through old tapes, talked to family members. It's a fascinating portrait of his father, and a really moving read.

His father never talked much about his childhood. So Michael learned a lot of surprising things about his father later on in life on his own. He'll describe what it was like to discover that his father had once performed with the Marx Brothers. Plus, he'll explain why he had an easy time drawing his father in the book, but struggled to draw himself.

Check out this interview on YouTube!


The Outshot: Sly and the Family Stone 1973's 'Fresh'

Finally, Jesse explains why "Fresh" was the last great album by Sly and the Family Stone ever recorded.

Check out this segment on YouTube!

One Bad Mother Episode 246: On Hold, Plus Children's Book Author Airlie Anderson

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Show: 
One Bad Mother
Guests: 
Airlie Anderson

Don’t hang up yet, you’re just on hold! Biz and Theresa wonder if putting things on hold until [fill in the blank] is a good thing, and if perhaps it's better to just let some things go so that we can return to them when we're ready. Let's hold off on answering that. Plus, Biz is in the moment but not in the zone, Theresa says, "I’ll do it myself!" and we talk to award-winning children's book author and illustrator Airlie Anderson about her new book, Neither, which is a beautiful celebration of diversity and inclusion.

To learn more about Airlie Anderson find her on twitter @airliebird visit her website, or check out her latest book Neither.

Chicago! We added another LIVE show at GMan Tavern on FRIDAY, May 11th at 8:00 p.m.! Tickets on sale now!

Check out our book! You're Doing A Great Job!: 100 Ways You're Winning at Parenting!

Thank you to all our listeners who support the show as monthly members of MaximumFun.org. Our sponsors this week are Care.com and Third Love. To save 15% off your first order, visit thirdlove.com/badmother. And visit care.com/mother to get 30% off of your premium membership.

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Show Music
Opening theme: Summon the Rawk, Kevin MacLeod (http://incompetech.com)
Ones and Zeros, Awesome, Beehive Sessions (http://awesomeinquotes.com, also avail on iTunes)
Mom Song, Adira Amram, Hot Jams For Teens (http://adiraamram.com, avail on iTunes)
Telephone, Awesome, Beehive Sessions (http://awesomeinquotes.com, also avail on iTunes)
Closing music: Mama Blues, Cornbread Ted and the Butterbeans

Bullseye: Lisa Hanawalt & Wyatt Cenac

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Lisa Hanawalt
Guests: 
Wyatt Cenac

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Lisa Hanawalt on BoJack Horseman, Food Obsessions and Martha Stewart’s Horse

Lisa Hanawalt enjoys exploring the strange ins and outs of her world using words and illustrations. Her penchant for drawing anthropomorphized animals to represent characters, including herself, reveals a childlike playfulness, even while exploring adult themes.

Her illustrations and writing have appeared in numerous print and online publications including McSweeney’s, Vanity Fair and the New York Times. In 2010, she earned the Ignatz Award for Outstanding Comic for her work on her first comic series, I Want You.

Her work can also be seen on Netflix’s Bojack Horseman, where Hanawalt serves as production designer and producer. She can also be heard on the Maximum Fun podcast, Baby Geniuses, which she co-hosts with Emily Heller.

Lisa Hanawalt sat down with Jesse to talk about her work on BoJack Horseman, her latest book of stories and illustrations and her fascination with Martha Stewart’s horse.

Lisa Hanawalt’s latest book is Hot Dog Taste Test


Photo: Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

Wyatt Cenac on Stand-Up Comedy and Creating Space for Diverse Voices

Wyatt Cenac is a stand-up comedian and writer who is best known as a former correspondent for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. On the program, Cenac’s segments often explored issues of politics and society from a black perspective and with a sharp satirical bite.

Cenac served as a writer and voice actor on King of the Hill as well as making appearances on other television shows including Inside Amy Schumer, BoJack Horseman and Maron.

Wyatt Cenac joined Jesse to talk about his new stand-up show, Night Train and the importance of providing a space for alternative voices in comedy.

Night Train is available now on Seeso.com.


Photo: Maddie Meyer / Getty Images

The Outshot: The Knuckleball

Jesse talk about the mystique and the power of baseball’s knuckleball.

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