Race

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Moshe Kasher, Brother Ali, and Felicia Day

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Moshe Kasher
Guests: 
Brother Ali
Guests: 
Felicia Day

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Moshe Kasher on his new Comedy Central show Problematic

Moshe Kasher has been a stand-up for the last 16 years. You've seen him on The Tonight show with Jimmy Fallon, Conan, and Chelsea Lately.

Now, he's got his own TV show. Problematic with Moshe Kasher is on Comedy Central right now. Like a lot of shows nowadays it has a comedian taking on issues of the day, talking with newsmakers. He's explored cultural appropriation on the show, technology, and Islamophobia, to name a few. But there's something really intriguing in the show's format. He talks with experts and everyday people and the result is this really frank and insightful conversation.

Moshe also had a pretty rough childhood. He grew in Oakland and got kicked out of a bunch of schools and did hard drugs for a while. He talks about that in his autobiography, Kasher in the Rye.

Moshe and Jesse talk about the rough parts about growing up in the Bay Area. He is candid about what he is learning in the transition between doing stand-up and hosting a television show. Finally, he tells us why he thinks a diverse representation of disabled people is lacking in the media, and why he is so keen to take on controversial issues on his new show.

You can watch Moshe's new Comedy Central TV show Problematic Tuesdays at Midnight and his autobiography Kasher and the Rye is out now.

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Photo: Alberto E. Rodriguez / Getty Images

Felicia Day on The Mighty Boosh

Felicia Day is a comedian, she's an actress, she's kind of a legend in the worlds of comedy and nerdy stuff. She had a recurring spot on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, worked with Wil Wheaton, she's also created and starred in her own web series called The Guild.

She tells us how with the weird British TV series The Mighty Boosh helped heal her with laughter, when she really needed help.

Felicia currently is starring in the anticipated reboot of Mystery Science Theater 3000 on Netflix.

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Photo: Daniel Yang

Brother Ali on his new album and why he's choosing beauty over resistance

Brother Ali is a rapper based out of Minnesota. He's part of the Rhymesayers collective - a label he shares with Aesop Rock, Dilated Peoples, and Atmosphere.

For the first part of his career, he focused a lot on making protest rap. His latest record is called All The Beauty In This Whole Life. And on it, he focuses on a lot more positive stuff. And he does it with a real honesty and openness at the same time. Ali talks about his faith a lot - he's been a Muslim since he was 15. He also talks about his albinism - and how having no pigment in his skin presented a ton of totally unique challenges growing up.

He and Jesse talk about what it was like growing up albino, and how that has affected his racial politics. He tells Jesse what it's like to have a black son in 2017, and why he's chosen to focus his music on love rather than protest in these tumultuous times.

His new album All The Beauty in This Whole Life is out now.

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The Outshot: In The Night Kitchen

Jesse recommends the kids book In The Night Kitchen for children, or adults, who need to remember why dreams are so important.

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Pop Rocket Episode 122: The Handmaid's Tale

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Show: 
Pop Rocket
Guests: 
Karen Tongson
Guests: 
Margaret Wappler
Guests: 
Wynter Mitchell

This week we have an all women episode of Pop Rocket! Karen is hosting, and the gang is talking about the new Hulu series of Margaret Atwood's 1985 classic novel The Handmaid's Tale. Margaret tells us about the differences between the series and the book. They explore whether or not Offred's internal dialogue works when portrayed as voiceover, and whether the racial make-up of the show was intentional. Does the music work, and does the show reflect anything from our current political climate? Margaret's all about is relishing in the dismantling of Fox News by the hands of its key contributors and Wynter talks about Netflix's Dear White People. Plus, the panel shares some light, vintage jams to help cleanse our palates after a particularly heavy discussion.

Read Margaret's interview with Margaret Atwood for the Los Angeles Times and don't forget to listen to Guy's interview with Atwood on Bullseye from 2015.

Jams:
Karen: Summertime - The Sunday's
Margaret: Perfect Strangers Theme Song
Wynter: California Girls -
Katy Perry

Karen Tongson, Margaret Wappler, and Wynter Mitchell

Each week we’ll add everyone’s jams to this handy Spotify playlist.

Other Links:
The Smarthmouth Podcast

You can let us know what you think of Pop Rocket and suggest topics in our Facebook group or via @PopRocket on Twitter.

Produced by Christian Dueñas and Kara Hart for MaximumFun.org

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: My Brother My Brother and Me and Gina Prince-Bythewood

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Justin McElroy
Guests: 
Travis McElroy
Guests: 
Griffin McElroy
Guests: 
Gina Prince-Bythewood

This week Linda Holmes of NPR's podcast Pop Culture Happy Hour fills in for Jesse this week.

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo:Screenshot Via MBMBaM Youtube Channel

My Brother My Brother and Me on their SeeSo show of the same name

This week guest host Linda Holmes talks with Justin, Travis and Griffin McElroy, the hilarious three brothers behind the comedy advice podcast My Brother, My Brother and Me. Recently, the brothers became the creators and stars of their very own TV series by the same name on the Seeso streaming network.

The McElroys tell Linda why it was important to them to film their new show in Huntington, West Virginia, where they grew up. They dish on the common misconceptions of their hometown, and what it was like to rope fellow Huntingtonians, including the mayor, into their antics.

The McElroys’ irreverent yet humane sense of humor has won them a following of very passionate fans, especially online. There’s even a McElroy wiki that catalogues the many callbacks and gags that have appeared in their comedy over the years, not to mention the brothers’ other shows with spouses, family members, and friends.

The McElroys tell Linda about how growing up in the same household shaped their comic sensibilities -- and how even after all these years, they’re still trying to make each other laugh.

All episodes of My Brother, My Brother and Me are now available to stream on Seeso. A free episode is available here.


Photo: Larry Busaca/Getty Images

Gina Prince-Bythewood on her new Fox miniseries Shots Fired

Gina Prince-Bythewood is a producer and writer who is probably best known for her 2000 movie Love and Basketball. Raised in Pacific Grove, California Gina moved down to Los Angeles to attend UCLA, graduating from the film school with honors. Gina has directed many movies since her 2000 breakthrough, films such as The Secret Life of Bee's and Beyond The Lights.

Her new project called Shots Fired, created with her husband Reggie Rock Bythewood, was a film idea turned mini series dealing with issues of race inequality and police corruption and violence against the black community. The murders of unarmed black men and women at the hands of white police officers and in particular the acquittal of George Zimmerman from the murder of Trayvon Martin were the catalyst for this project.

Gina tells Linda how rejection has influenced her work ethic, why she thinks it's important to represent diverse experiences and casts, and why she think Love and Basketball is cherished by so many people.

You can watch Shots Fired on Fox every Wednesday at 8/7c.

The Outshot: Pete Seeger

Photo: Bryan Bedder/Getty Images

Linda tells us about a musician who can turn literally anybody into a great singer, doesn't matter who you are.

Pop Rocket Episode 110: The Grammys with Chris Molanphy

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Show: 
Pop Rocket
Guests: 
Margaret Wappler
Guests: 
Wynter Mitchell
Guests: 
Karen Tongson
Guests: 
Chris Molanphy

This week, Guy is in New York but not to fear! Margaret Wappler fills in as host with Wynter Mitchell and Karen Tongson to talk about music's biggest night, The Grammys. They talk about everything, from the production to the performances to the winners and almost more importantly, the losers. Music critic for outlets like Slate, NPR, and Pitchfork Chris Molanphy pops in to provide context about The Grammys and to deliver his opinion on the results. Plus the panelists share what they're all about this week, and what they can't stop listening to.

Karen Tongson, Wynter Mitchell, and Margaret Wappler

Jams:

Margaret Wappler - Kourosh Yaghmaei - Leila
Wynter Mitchell - Bambaata - Unconditional
Karen Tongson - Prince - Starfish and Coffee

Each week we'll add everyone's jams to this handy Spotify playlist.

You can let us know what you think of Pop Rocket and suggest topics in our Facebook group or via @PopRocket on Twitter.

Other Links:
Buffalo Bill's Dance Scene
Barbara Streisand and Neil Diamond - You Don't Bring Me Flowers
Vic Berger- Donald Trump's Huge Announcement

Produced by Christian Dueñas and Kara Hart for MaximumFun.org

Minority Korner Episode 35: To Be... Or Not to Be Offended Part. Deux Electric Boogaloo

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James is back from his epic journey to Niagara Falls and Fire Island, Nnekay is... well stuck in her car again, this time she's a little less hot... and not alone. We also take a moment to gather our thoughts in the horror of Orlando. We'll be diving in deep on the topic in future episodes. For now enjoy our previously recorded episode on Political Correctness, what white people can do to stop promoting subtle racism (which can be applied to straight allies and homophobia during this current time) and a follow up on the Kids For Cash scandal.

Minority Korner Ep 34: Everyone Needs A Little Side Eye!

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Show: 
Minority Korner

It's our first episode as part of the Maximum Fun Network and it is hot and fresh! So hot and fresh that James has a sunburn! Nnekay also loses it while James practices some new voices inspired by the Jungle Book. Nnekay takes us on a journey through some Black Girl Magic with young up and coming black women poets. James is about to blow the Kinsey Scale out of the water with the new Purple-Red Scale -- where do you land?! Are you a A0 or an F5? Another quizlet korner! Will Nnekay succeed again? This week we cover Bernie Sanders, Zika, DMX, Cheese Rolls and more! ENJOY!

http://blackgirllonghair.com/2016/05/7-more-dope-black-women-poets-you-n...

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Jason Sudeikis, Sarah Vowell & Paul F. Tompkins

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Jason Sudeikis
Guests: 
Paul F. Tompkins
Guests: 
Sarah Vowell

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.

And if you're looking for a particular segment to listen to or share, check us out on Soundcloud.

Photo by Jesse Thorn

Jason Sudeikis on Mentorship, Fame and his Blue Man Group Aspirations

Jason Sudeikis is an actor, comedian and screenwriter, probably best known for time spent as a writer and performer on Saturday Night Live.

His comedic skills were honed as a founding member of Second City Las Vegas and have been enjoyed by audiences on television shows including 30 Rock and Eastbound & Down as well as the films Horrible Bosses and We’re the Millers.

His recent work has taken a more dramatic turn, and includes his role in the film Race, which tells the story of track and field legend Jesse Owens' pursuit of the gold in the 1936 Berlin Olympic Games. Sudeikis plays Owens' coach, Larry Snyder, who mentored and coached him through his time at Ohio State University and into the Olympics.

Race is in theaters now.

Sudeikis joined Jesse to talk about his aspirations to join The Blue Man Group, the role that his own mentors have played in his life and what it’s like to have his personal life serve as fodder for tabloid media.

If you liked this, share it! Click here for a streaming, embeddable version of this interview.


Photo by Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

"I Wish I'd Made That": Sarah Vowell on her Love of Randy Newman and "The World Isn’t Fair"

Artists -- the people that make stuff -- are always influenced by the work of others. And sometimes, something an artist sees is so good, so perfect that they wish they had made it themselves.

This happens so often to the people we talk to, that we made a segment about it. It’s called "I Wish I’d Made That". This week, we talk to author and social commentator Sarah Vowell who joins us to talk about the Randy Newman song, "The World Isn’t Fair".

You probably don't need us to tell you who Sarah Vowell is, if you're listening to an NPR podcast, but she's a frequent contributor to This American Life, and is the author of multiple bestselling books including Assassination Vacation and Unfamiliar Fishes.

Vowell's latest book is about the Marquis de Lafayette, a Frenchman who became a sort of adopted son to George Washington and fought in the American Revolutionary War. It's called Lafayette in the Somewhat United States.

You can find her other appearances on our show here and here.

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Photo by Jesse Thorn

Paul F. Tompkins Talks Success, Podcasting and Improvising with Puppets

Paul F. Tompkins has a certain kind of fame. If you're a comedy fan, he is known and beloved for his appearances on comedy podcasts (including his own) or from his live stand up and improv comedy. But to the world at large, he's probably best known for his work as a writer and performer on the HBO cult comedy show Mr. Show with Bob and David.

In recent years, he's started his own improv podcast, Spontaneanation with Paul F. Tompkins, and also currently hosts the show No, You Shut Up! on the Fusion network.

No, You Shut Up! is a talk show in the vein of "Meet the Press", if its talking heads were actually puppets from Henson Alternative. The show airs Thursday nights at 10pm on Fusion. Episodes are also available on YouTube.

Tompkins joined Jesse to talk about what it feels like to become more personal in his stand-up, the role of podcasting in his success and what it’s like to improvise with puppets.

If you liked this, share it! Click here for a streaming, embeddable version of this segment.

The Outshot: SNL’s Tales of Fraud and Malfeasance in Railroad Hiring Practices

Can a Saturday Night Live sketch change the course of your life?

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Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Kaitlin Olson & Jeff Chang

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Kaitlin Olson
Guests: 
Jeff Chang


Photo: Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

Kaitlin Olson on "Sweet Dee" and the Morally Bankruptcy in It's Always Sunny on Philadelphia

Kaitlin Olson plays Sweet Dee on the long-running sitcom It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia. Dee is the only female member of "The Gang", a bunch of depraved, self-centered pals who run a bar. The Gang is constantly looking for ways to get rich quick, humiliate their enemies, get out of work, and prove once and for all the talent, charisma and brilliance they hold to be self-evident. In an unusual move for a solo female character, Dee doesn't serve to counterbalance the guys' bad behavior -- she absolutely matches their pace.

Olson talks to us about creating a more fully-fleshed character for Dee, how she came to comedy, and how she ended up dating (and marrying) her showrunner.

It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia is currently in its tenth season. It airs Wednesday nights at 10pm on FXX.

If you liked this, share it! Click here for a streaming, embeddable version of this interview.


Photo credit: Jeremy Keith Villaluz

Jeff Chang on Art, Race, and How Diversity Now Means "Them"

About ten years ago, Jeff Chang published his book Can't Stop Won't Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation. His new book is a sort of follow-up -- it chronicles some of the cultural and racial shifts we've experienced as a nation. It's called Who We Be: The Colorization of America.

Chang talks to us about what "diversity" means to us today, the struggle for artists to defy racial categorization, and how and why corporations embraced multiculturalism.

If you liked this, share it! Click here for a streaming, embeddable version of this interview

The Outshot: What It Means to Be Superhuman

Jesse tells us about the life and legend of Andre the Giant.

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Judge John Hodgman Episode 86: The Statute of Physical Limitations

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Shumanay brings this week's case against her husband Jon. A chronic illness has long prevented Shumanay from engaging in strenuous physical activity, but recent improvements in her condition have allowed her to take up running. She would like to take advantage of her new abilities by participating in a long-distance endurance run with obstacles, but Jon objects to the plan, citing possible threats to Shumanay's health and a belief that Shumanay's chosen race is silly and embarrassing. Who is in the right? Judge John Hodgman decides.

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