horror

Episode 119: Pop Rocket Likes It Raw with April Wolfe

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Guy, April Wolfe, Karen, Wynter
Show: 
Pop Rocket
Guests: 
Guy Branum
Guests: 
Karen Tongson
Guests: 
Wynter Mitchell
Guests: 
April Wolfe

On this week's Pop Rocket, Guy Branum, Wynter Mitchell and Karen Tongson are joined by LA Weekly film critic April Wolfe for a deep dive into the French horror film Raw by director Julia Ducournau. The movie centers on Justine, a young vegetarian who, along with her sister, is studying to become a veterinarian. When Justine is pressured to eat a rabbit's kidney at a party, that act unleashes all her carnal desires, such as the desire to eat people. When Raw screened in Los Angeles, theaters handed out barf bags to moviegoers because some people can't handle the graphic realism. In this episode, you'll find out why April considers this to be one of the best horror movies of all time. Karen Tongson impresses with a quick history lesson on French veterinary science, and Guy and Wynter explore the ways fear of female sexuality plays such a core role in horror films.

Also in this episode, April's all about the Anne Hathaway film "Colossal", Wynter's all about that Pepsi ad, Guy's all about Shit Town and Karen thinks folks should get into season three of "Grace & Frankie". Plus, the gang shares their favorite jams, but this week Guy's jam isn't a song. It's the horrific footage of the United passenger getting dragged through the plane.

It's a jam-packed episode. Enjoy!

With Guy Branum, Wynter Mitchell, Karen Tongson and April Wolfe.

That’s My Jam:

April Wolfe - Kleenex/ Liliput - Hitch-Hike
Karen Tongson - Lionel Richie - You Are
Wynter Mitchell - Iggy Azalea - Mo Bounce

Each week we’ll add everyone’s jams to this handy Spotify playlist.

You can let us know what you think of Pop Rocket and suggest topics in our Facebook group or via @PopRocket on Twitter.

Produced by Christian Dueñas and Kara Hartfor MaximumFun.org.

Pop Rocket Episode 113: Get Out

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Show: 
Pop Rocket
Guests: 
Guy Branum
Guests: 
Karen Tongson
Guests: 
Wynter Mitchell
Guests: 
Margaret Wappler

This week, Guy, Wynter, Margaret, and Karen talk about Jordan Peele's newest horror film Get Out*. They discuss the racial and political implications of the film, Wynter contextualizes the role of black people within the horror genre, and the gang discuss their favorite scenes from the movie. As always,the panel tells us what they are all about this week. Karen talks about 45 eating America's meat of choice with ketchup, Margaret recommends a memoire and Wynter talks about Feud. Plus Guy keeps us up to date on his latest obsession with Calypso, and the rest of the gang provide their latest jams.
*Please note that this episode is rife with spoilers, so if you haven't seen the movie yet, please keep this in mind!

With:

Guy Branum, Karen Tongson, Wynter Mitchell, and Margaret Wappler

Jams:

Guy Branum - Calypso Rose - Leave Me Alone
Margaret Wappler - Sharon Van Etton - End of the World
Wynter Mitchell - Phonte - Something
Karen Tongson - Go West - King of Wishful Thinking

Each week we’ll add everyone’s jams to this handy Spotify playlist.

You can let us know what you think of Pop Rocket and suggest topics in our Facebook group or via @PopRocket on Twitter.

Other Links:
Key and Peele's "Shining" Sketch
Helen Rosner "Actually, How Donald Trump Eats His Steak Does Matter

Produced by Christian Dueñas and Kara Hart for MaximumFun.org

Pop Rocket Episode 97: Monsters

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Guy, Andrew, Maragret, and Danielle
Show: 
Pop Rocket
Guests: 
Guy Branum
Guests: 
Margaret Wappler
Guests: 
Danielle Radford
Guests: 
Andrew Ti

This week, Guy sits down with Margaret and special guests Danielle Radford of the Maximum Fun podcast Tights and Fights and Andrew Ti of Earwolf's Yo, Is This Racist? to talk about Monsters of all kinds. We find out what monsters scare them them the most, what kind of monster would characterize today's society, and why zombies are so scary.

With Guy Branum, Margaret Wappler, Danielle Radfor, and Andrew Ti

That's My Jam:

Margaret Wappler - Danielle Radford - Daddy Lessons
Andrew Ti - Classic Man (Chopped and Screwed)

Each week we’ll add everyone’s jams to this handy Spotify playlist.

You can let us know what you think of Pop Rocket and suggest topics in our Facebook group or via @PopRocket on Twitter.

Produced by Christian Dueñas and Kara Hartfor MaximumFun.org.

Pop Rocket: Episode 43 Halloween Horror Showdown

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Wynter, Margaret, Guy & Oliver
Guests: 
Guy Branum
Guests: 
Wynter Mitchell
Guests: 
Oliver Wang
Guests: 
Margaret Wappler

Young Adult fiction, hip hop podcasts and our favorite horror movies.

With Guy Branum, Wynter Mitchell, Oliver Wang and Margaret Wappler.

That’s My Jam:
Wynter Mitchell - Used To by Mutemath
Oliver Wang - Why Can't We Live Together by Timmy Thomas
Margaret Wappler - The It Follows Theme by Disasterpeace

Each week we’ll add everyone’s jams to this handy Spotify playlist.

Other useful links this week…
Margaret recommends Rainbow Rowell's new YA novel Carry On.
Oliver's been listening to The Cipher, The Combat Jack Show & The Huffington Post'sLove and Sex Podcast.

Horror movies we talk about liking include: The Exorcist, Rosemary's Baby, Attack the Block, The Gate, Monster Squad, The Omen, The Brood, The Dark Crystal, Salem's Lot, The Craft, Fright Night, An American Werewolf in London, Event Horizon, Aliens, Cabin in the Woods, The Blob and Prince of Darkness.

You can let us know what you think of Pop Rocket and suggest topics in our Facebook group or via @PopRocket on Twitter.

On the History and Origin of Dracula's Use of the Bizarre Expletive "Bleh!"

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On this week’s episode of Judge John Hodgman, His Honor set a task for devoted listeners. As your Halloween homework, he asked you to research the origin of Dracula’s use of the term “Bleh!”

Since you are a wonderful, loyal and intellectually curious audience, many listeners wrote in promoting a variety of interesting theories. The first, and likely the most commonly held, suggests that the "word" slowly seeped into our lexicon whilst we absorbed countless indistinguishable impressions of legendary Dracula performer Bela Lugosi. Nathaniel Reha promoted this theory, lifting a quote from the Straight Dope boards: “Actually, thinking about it a sec, I’m hearing a hundred-odd bad impersonations of Bela Lugosi in my head, doing the “I vant to suck your blood!” line. Blood, in the bad accent, becomes ‘bluh’ (with a shortened, almost silent, d or t sound at the end of the word), which just becomes the one readily identifiable word when you think of someone’s bad Hungarian/Transylvanian vampire-speak.” Though listener John McGlothlin notes “[I]f your letter-writer-inner was convinced that ‘bluh’ did not originate in strict canon, that would rule out it stemming directly from Lugosi’s accent in the 1930’s Dracula film.”

Which leads to our second theory. Several listeners suggested that the phrase first appeared in a 1952 Bela Lugosi film called "My Son the Vampire". Jamie McCormick wrote: “The earliest occurrence I can find of a Dracula character making the sound is from 'My Son, The Vampire', a 1953 musical satire starring Lugosi in essence mocking the franchise he himself created. Nosferatu, in company with the other early silent Dracula films, makes no reference to the sound, nor does Lugosi make the sound in his early and serious-minded Dracula films. Note especially the last line of the film's title track – “He wants Bluuuuuuuuuuud!”

Jamie also provided links to the film for those who want to verify this theory. You can find the full film on You Tube or on Netflix; but Jamie also astutely notes that only the Netflix version has the song "My Son, the Vampire" rolling over the credits. Why?

I did some further research. Actually, that title song provides a rather interesting clue. As listener John McGlothlin noted, “[A]round . . . 1964, Allan Sherman put out a comedy song titled “My Son, the Vampire” which opens with “blood!” being screamed in a strange way that sounds rather ‘bluh’ like.” This Allan Sherman tune is the title song of the movie in some (but not all) versions of the film. According to IMDB , the film's original title was “Vampire Over London”, (this is the version available on You Tube), but it was apparently retitled "My Son, the Vampire" for its 1963 American re-release (six years after Bela Lugosi's death) to cash in on the success of Allan Sherman's album, "My Son, the Folksinger". Indeed, there is an American trailer for the film that prominently features Mr. Sherman:

I also discovered that Rhino released an EP of Sherman’s work in 2005 that includes “My Son, The Vampire”. So for 99 cents you can nab the song from itunes and consider the audio evidence yourself. (Although, truthfully, you hear him utter the critical word during the few seconds of the song's free preview).

A third theory, promoted by multiple listeners, claims that the sound was first uttered by comedian Gabe Dell. Kevin Harris first advanced this theory without any video or audio evidence; but listener Cayman Unterborn did all of the heavy lifting for him by providing an extensive defense of Dell as the source of the original parody. First, he provided this explanation from Svenghoolie (who he identifies as a venerable Chicago Horror Icon): “. . . Bela, as Dracula, never said ‘Bleh!’ It was indeed an imitator – back in the days of the old Steve Allen TV show; one of his stock players, Gabriel Dell (who had, at one time, been a ‘Dead End Kid’ in movies – and may have even worked with Bela in a cut-rate Monogram movie) was playing Dracula – and did the ‘bleh!’ thing (or, do you spell it ‘blah!’) From there on, it was history. So many Drac and/or Bela impersonators have done that now that most people assume that Bela actually did that . . .” Unterborn also found a CD that appears to feature a 1963 recording of Gabriel Dell doing his Dracula character (not on the Steve Allen show) and he also points out that you can download audio of the relevant Steve Allen Show episodes where Dell performs as Dracula, but it's going to cost. In terms of putting these performances on the correct spot in our "bleh!" timeline, I discovered that, according to IMDB, Dell performed this character on Steve Allen's Plymouth Show in 1957 (episode 2.35) and again in 1959 (episode 5.3). So that puts it after the original release of "Vampire Over London", but before the re-release of that film with the Allan Sherman title song.

Finally, two listeners suggested a connection to comedian Lenny Bruce. John McGlothin (who, along with Adam Pracht, tried to maximize his chances of winning by providing support for three of these theories) notes that “[I]n the 1960s, Lenny Bruce did a parody of Dracula as a Yiddish man, and the Eastern European accent may have made blood sound a bit like “bluh.” But McGlothin did not provide links to any video or audio which verifies Bruce’s performance or its place in this timeline. This theory does, however, have the backing of reference librarian Emily Menchal who states that there is support for the Lenny Bruce theory in David Skal’s book The Monster Show: A Cultural History of Horror.

That concludes my dutiful summary of the wonderful answers you uncovered.

So who's right? Only one man can judge the true winner of this contest! And we await his verdict.

Bruce Campbell, Producer, Writer and B-Movie Icon: Interview on The Sound of Young America

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L: Bruce Campbell, R: Jordan Morris at Comic-Con 2011
Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Bruce Campbell

Our guest host this week is MaxFun's very own Jordan Morris! He's a host and producer on FuelTV's The Daily Habit and of course, co-hosts our own podcast Jordan, Jesse, Go! You can also see him performing comedy at numerous venues throughout Los Angeles. Fun fact: Jordan is one of the original co-hosts of The Sound of Young America, so this is a return to form. He'll talk to a man of horror movie legend, Bruce Campbell.

Bruce Campbell is best known as a B movie icon and one of the stars of the Evil Dead films. He's also a writer and producer who's continued to have a DIY aesthetic and feeling infuse his work (including his own film, My Name Is Bruce). He talks to us about finding a niche in horror and black humor, obsessive fans, and more.

You can see him on Thursdays at 9/8c on USA's Burn Notice as covert operative Sam Axe and in his own spin-off TV movie Burn Notice: The Fall of Sam Axe, now on DVD.

Click here for a full transcript of this interview.
OR
Stream or download this interview now.

JORDAN MORRIS: This is The Sound of Young America, I'm Jordan Morris. My guest today is Bruce Campbell, an actor, director, and author, best known to film geeks as the star of the cult classics Evil Dead, Maniac Cop, Bubba Ho-Tep, too many to mention. He can now be seen on the television program Burn Notice, the HIT television program I should say. The Burn Notice feature length film The Fall of Sam Axe is on DVD and Blu-ray now. Bruce, thanks for coming on the show.

BRUCE CAMPBELL: Great plug, by the way, great plug.

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