film

Podcast: World of Wonder with Terry Gilliam and Chris Elliott

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Bullseye

This week on The Sound of Young America, two men who hold the keys to WORLDS OF WONDER.

Chris Elliott came to prominence in the early 1980s as the buffoonish foil on "Late Night with David Letterman." His career has also included the cult sitcom "Get A Life" and film "Cabin Boy," as well as several seasons on the hit sitcom "Everybody Love Raymond." Most recently, he's become an author, and his absurd 19th century mystery, "The Shroud of the Thwacker," has just been released in paperback. Be sure to take a listen to our special bonus questions for Chris for comedy nerd insider info on his specials, "Action Family" and "FDR: The One Man Show," among other stuff.

Then we speak with Terry Gilliam. Since his days as a member of Monty Python's Flying Circus, he's directed many acclaimed films, including "Brazil," "Time Bandits," "The Fisher King," and "Fear & Loathing in Las Vegas." His most recent film, "Tideland," a dark and disturbing fairy tale, is in theaters now.

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Bonus: Extra Questions for Chris Elliott


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Previously on The Sound of Young America:
Holiday Party with Chris Elliott (MP3)
Joke Warfare with Monty Python's Terry Jones

Podcast: The Indies

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Bullseye

This week on The Sound of Young America, we look at the indie spirit.

Animator Bill Plympton has always worked independently, creating both short and feature-length animated films. He draws every frame himself, and his absurd humor has netted him two Oscar nominations. He also recently created a music video for Kanye West, about which he talks in our bonus interview. His most recent release is "Plymptoons: The Complete Early Works of Bill Plympton," which includes his Oscar-nominated "Your Face."

Our second guest is Doug Martsch, from the indie rock group Built to Spill. Since coming out of the Seattle rock scene in the early 1990s, Built to Spill have been one of the most important and influential bands in the indie/alternative rock movement. Martsch is considered by many to be the heir to J Mascis' alterna-rock guitar god throne. We talk with Doug about his nearly 20-year career in rock, and why he was never able to support himself with music until he signed to a major label. The band has a new album, "You in Reverse," and is currently on tour.

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Bonus Interviews with Bill Plympton Here

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Podcast: Career Killers

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Bullseye

This week's Sound of Young America broadcast commemorates my recent layoff with the theme "Career Killers."

My first guest, Annabelle Gurwitch, is the former host of TBS' "Dinner and a Movie," and a comedienne. Her book, "Fired: Tales of the Canned, Cancelled, Downsized, & Dismissed" compiles stories of firings from folks like Felicity Huffman and David Cross. She herself was fired from a play by Woody Allen, who said her performance was "retarded." We talk with her about getting fired, some of the most interesting stories in the book (Jeff Garlin's is a doozy), and more. She's appearing at the San Francisco Documentary Film Festival May 19th and 20th with Robert Reich.

Our second guest, Dan Clowes, is the screenwriter for the new film Art School Confidential. More importantly, though, he's the creator of the long-running comic book title Eightball. Eightball was the birthplace of the film, as well as the home of the story which became "Ghost World." We talk with Dan about his experiences in art school, his artistic process, working with director Terry Zwigoff and more.

Also, a comedy sketch from Free Love Forum.

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Podcast: Hollywood Outsiders

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Bullseye

This week's Sound of Young America looks at the world of movies from a variety of perspectives outside of the inside.

Sean Uyehara is a programmer for the San Francisco International Film Festival, which is currently running here in the City by the Bay. We talk with him about what it's like to watch 1400 movies a year. Also, he talks about some of the more exciting events at this year's festival, including a discussion of machinima from the creators of Red Vs. Blue, and a remarkable video mashup experience from Addictive TV. You can also read more of Sean's thoughts on the festival here.

Sharon Waxman is the Los Angeles Times' Hollywood reporter, but she wasn't always in the entertainment news business. She started out as a foreign correspondent, and admits she only came to the Tinseltown game out of "desperation." Her book, "Rebels in the Backlot" traces the indie film explosion of the mid-90s. It focuses on the work of Quentin Tarantino, PT Anderson, David Fincher, Steven Sodebergh, David O. Russel, and Spike Jonze. It was recently released in paperback.

Philip Lopate's new book is the Library of America's "American Movie Critics: From the Silents Until Now." The huge tome covers film writing from the silent era until now. We talk with Philip about how criticism has changed over the past hundred years, his favorite critics and why, and the role of film criticism in society.

Also, a message from Your Friend in Hollywood, Jen Kirkman.

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