Bob Odenkirk

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Bob Odenkirk & Rickey Vincent

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Bob Odenkirk: Cult-Comedy Icon, Reluctant Celebrity

Millions of Breaking Bad fans know Bob Odenkirk as sleazy criminal lawyer, Saul Goodman. He has reprised the role the spin-off show Better Call Saul which is in its second season.

But comedy fans already knew about Odenkirk from another show -- Mr. Show with Bob and David. Odenkirk’s outrageous and profanity-ridden outbursts were a staple of his performances and helped make him a cult-comedy icon.

Before that he wrote for Saturday Night Live. Perhaps his most notable work was co-writing the sketch Down by the River The bit featured a 35-year-old divorcee motivational speaker played by Chris Farley and is considered one of the best sketches in the history of the SNL.

When Mr. Show ended, Odenkirk appeared in a number of one-off roles for TV before working behind the camera. He directed Let’s Go to Prison, Melvin Goes to Dinner and The Brothers Solomon. Even though he loves directing, it’ll be a while before he decides to gives it another shot. He’ll explain.

Odenkirk talks to us about why writing timeless humor is so difficult, transitioning from comedy to drama and why he still doesn’t consider himself a celebrity.

Odenkirk will also read a selection from his collection of short-fiction humor. It’s called A Load of Hooey and is available now.

Better Call Saul airs Monday nights at 10 pm on AMC.

Cannonball: Touring Parliament's Mothership Connection with Rickey Vincent

Every so often we like to take a closer look at albums that should be considered classics, to find out what makes them great. It's Cannonball.

This week we're joined by author, historian and self-described funkateer, Rickey Vincent. He's going to talk about Parliament's landmark R&B album, Mothership Connection. The album is at once a celebration of the past and a glimpse into the future. It touches on a lot of traditional soul ideas, but delivered with a new funky edge. Vincent will explain more.

Vincent's recent book is called PARTY MUSIC: The Inside Story of the Black Panthers Band and How Black Power Transformed Soul Music. You can also hear his radio show The History of Funk on KPFA.

The Outshot: Why Can't We Live Together by Timmy Thomas

Jesse tells us about a song that makes him imagine a better world: the simple but powerful Why Can't We Live Together by Timmy Thomas.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Best Comedy of 2014 Special

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Show: 
Bullseye

Today we're spotlighting what we think is the greatest comedy of the year. The Bullseye staff has poured over plenty of records, including industry veterans, newcomers and lesser known talents. Now we're ready to showcase what we think is the best stand up comedy of 2014.

You can find all of these albums available for purchase, except for the set from the Atlantic Ocean Comedy and Music Festival.

Patton Oswalt - Tragedy Plus Comedy Equals Time

Cristela Alonzo - Some Of The Hits

Cameron Esposito - Same Sex Symbol

Jasper Redd - Jazz Talk

Jim Gaffigan - Obsessed

Hannibal Buress - Live From Chicago

Tommy Johnagin - Stand-Up Comedy 3

Nadia Kamil at the the Atlantic Ocean Comedy and Music Festival

Chris Gethard - My Comedy Album

Andrés du Bouchet - 20-Sided Guy

Bob Odenkirk - Amateur Hour

Jackie Kashian - This Will Make an Excellent Horcrux

Sarah Silverman - We Are Miracles

Hari Kondabolu - Waiting for 2042

Did we miss your favorite stand up special this year? Add your recommendation to the list! You can discuss this episode on our forum. You can also talk about it at Maximum Fun's sub Reddit, or join our lively discussions in the Maximum Fun Facebook group. Or you can just Tweet us -- @Bullseye.

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.
And if you're looking for a particular segment to listen to or share, check us out on Soundcloud.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Bob Odenkirk

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Bob Odenkirk


Valerie Macon/Getty Images Entertainment/Getty Images

Bob Odenkirk: Cult-Comedy Icon, Reluctant Celebrity

Millions of Breaking Bad fans know Bob Odenkirk as sleazy criminal lawyer, Saul Goodman. He’ll be reprising the role in February in the spin-off show Better Call Saul.

But comedy fans already knew about Odenkirk from another show -- Mr. Show with Bob and David. Odenkirk’s outrageous and profanity-ridden outbursts were a staple of his performances and helped make him a cult-comedy icon.

Before that he wrote for Saturday Night Live. Perhaps his most notable work was co-writing the sketch Down by the River The bit featured a 35-year-old divorcee motivational speaker played by Chris Farley and is considered one of the best sketches in the history of the SNL.

When Mr. Show ended, Odenkirk appeared in a number of one-off roles for TV before working behind the camera. He directed Let’s Go to Prison, Melvin Goes to Dinner and The Brothers Solomon. Even though he loves directing, it’ll be a while before he decides to gives it another shot. He’ll explain.

Odenkirk talks to us about why writing timeless humor is so difficult, transitioning from comedy to drama and why he still doesn’t consider himself a celebrity.

Odenkirk will also read a selection from his new collection of short-fiction humor. It’s called A Load of Hooey and is available now.

Odenkirk also just released his debut stand-up comedy special, Amateur Hour. We'll be showcasing a clip from it in our Best Comedy of 2014 Special at the end of the year.

If you liked this, share it! Click here for a streaming, embeddable version of this interview.

Cannonball: Touring Parliament's Mothership Connection with Rickey Vincent

Every so often we like to take a closer look at albums that should be considered classics, to find out what makes them great. It's Cannonball.

This week we're joined by author, historian and self-described funkateer, Rickey Vincent. He's going to talk about Parliament's landmark R&B album, Mothership Connection. The album is at once a celebration of the past and a glimpse into the future. It touches on a lot of traditional soul ideas, but delivered with a new funky edge. Vincent will explain more.

Vincent has a new book out. It's called PARTY MUSIC: The Inside Story of the Black Panthers Band and How Black Power Transformed Soul Music. You can also hear his radio show The History of Funk on KPFA.

If you liked this, share it! Click here for a streaming, embeddable version of this interview.

The Outshot: Why Can't We Live Together by Timmy Thomas

Jesse tells us about a song that makes him imagine a better world: the simple but powerful Why Can't We Live Together by Timmy Thomas.

If you liked this, share it! Click here for a streaming, embeddable version of this segment.

Trikke

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Not really sure how to describe this video, by Andre Hyland, but it's pretty great. via Bob Odenkirk

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