Bullseye

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Edie Falco and Hunter Pence

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Edie Falco
Guests: 
Hunter Pence

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Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

Edie Falco on her new movie "Outside In"

Edie Falco was over a decade into her acting career before she got her breakout role as Carmela Soprano in the classic HBO mob drama "The Sopranos." She then went on to play the title role in the Showtime dark comedy "Nurse Jackie" for which she won an Emmy in 2010 for outstanding lead actress in a comedy series.

Edie's newest film is called "Outside In." She plays Carol, a married high school English teacher who became pen pals with a former student named Chris while he was in jail serving a 20- year sentence. After Chris gets out of prison, things get complicated between them.

Edie talks to Jesse about landing her first acting gig, which she started the day after she graduated from SUNY Purchase's acting school, why she thinks comedy isn't for her, and James Gandolfini, the late actor who she worked with for nearly a decade on "The Sopranos."

Click here to listen to Edie Falco's interview on YouTube.


Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Hunter Pence on his unique approach to playing baseball

Baseball player Hunter Pence was drafted in 2004 by the Houston Astros. He debuted in the majors in 2007 and by 2009 was named an All-Star. Now he plays right field for the San Francisco Giants and was instrumental in bringing the team to victory in two world series.

Hunter has also been subject to some of the weirdest heckles in baseball - handheld signs that say stuff like "Hunter Pence Can't Parallel Park," "Hunter Pence eats Pizza with a Fork," and "Hunter Pence Thinks Game of Thrones is Just Ok." He talks with Jesse about what he thinks about these strange and inaccurate callouts, why he wears such high socks, and his Houston coffee shop and gaming cafe called Coral Sword.

Click here to listen to Hunter Pence's interview on YouTube.


Photo: www.netflix.com

The Outshot: Netflix's "Toast of London"

In the British TV comedy "Toast of London," Matt Berry plays honey-voiced British actor Steven Toast. Toast lives in modern London but acts more like a British stage actor from 1976. After a terrible career decision, he's forced to take on horrible job after horrible job while trying to navigate life as a newly divorced man.

Click here to listen to Jesse's Outshot on "Toast of London" on YouTube.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Alexander Payne, Kay Cannon, and Eugene Levy

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Bullseye
Guests: 
Alexander Payne
Guests: 
Kay Cannon
Guests: 
Eugene Levy

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Vittorio Zunino Celotto/Getty Images for BF

Filmmaker Alexander Payne on his film 'Downsizing'

Alexander Payne is an accomplished writer and director. He's won two Academy Awards for Best Adapted Screenplay for the films "Sideways" and "The Descendants." His other films have been nominated for tons of awards, too -- "About Schmidt," "Nebraska," and "Election." His films are known for their satirical nature, dark humor and usually include some sort of existential crisis. His latest film "Downsizing" is no exception.

The movie centers on Paul and Audrey, an average couple from Omaha, played by Matt Damon and Kristen Wiig. In an effort to combat overpopulation and global warming, people can be shrunk down to about five inches. But things don't go exactly as planned for the couple.

Jesse sat down with Alexander Payne to talk about his love of silent films, what it was like to achieve success for his thesis film shortly after graduating college, and how he bonds with his six-month-old through film. Plus, he'll tell us about his favorite sequence in "Downsizing," and why he loved directing the challenging eight minute scene.


Photo: Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for SXSW

The Craziest Day Of My Entire Career: Kay Cannon

Kay Cannon is a brilliant and hilarious writer. You know her work -- she wrote all three of the Pitch Perfect movies. Before that, she spent five years on "30 Rock," first as a writer and then as a supervising producer. Kay then went on to work on Fox's "New Girl" and she also created the Netflix original series "Girlboss."

Her directorial debut, "Blockers" is in theaters now. In the film, three teen girls make a pact to lose their virginity on prom night. Their parents, played by Leslie Mann, Ike Barinholtz and John Cena, will do everything they can to stop them.

Kay Cannon tells us about the craziest day of her entire career, which starts on the Golden Gate Bridge, takes a scary private plane flight in a private jet and ends in an awkward meeting with John Cena.


Photo: Frazer Harrison/Getty Images

Eugene Levy on working with his son on 'Schitt's Creek'

Eugene Levy is probably best known for his role as Noah Levenstein in the "American Pie" franchise. Noah is the nerdy, oftentimes clueless dad of Jim Levenstein (Jason Biggs). Noah's efforts to help Jim navigate puberty often result in embarrassing and awkward situations for Jim. The film series spans eight films, and Eugene is the only actor to appear in all of them.

He first got his start in improv comedy. He was a founding member of SCTV - the pioneering sketch comedy show that helped launch the careers of Rick Moranis, John Candy, Catherine O'Hara, and many, many more.

Recently, he's been reunited with Catherine O'Hara in the sitcom "Schitt's Creek." The show was created by Eugene and his son, Dan Levy. Eugene plays Johnny Rose, the patriarch of a socialite family that lost their fortune. Johnny and his wife Moira, played by Catherine, head to the last place they can call their own: the backwoods Canadian town Johnny bought as a gag gift the year before. Together the family pieces their life back together.

Eugene sits down with Jesse and talks about what it was like to work with his son on "Schitt's Creek," and why he almost turned down his iconic role from "American Pie."


Photo: SFMOMA

The Outshot: Rigo 23’s “found lost bird” posters

And finally, Jesse tells us about a recent visit to the Museum of Modern Art in San Francisco. He describes the lost bird posters collected by Rigo 23 in the 1990's from the Mission District in San Francisco. The posters reflect the lives of the people who posted them, but also serves as a reminder of a community that no longer exists.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Andrew W.K. and Bill Hader

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Bullseye
Guests: 
Andrew W.K.
Guests: 
Bill Hader

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Andrew W.K. on his new album "You're Not Alone"

Rock musician Andrew W.K. is beloved not only for his bombastic, maximalist metal and transformative live performances but also for his work as a motivational speaker. If you ever go to one of his speaking engagements, whether or not you're a fan of rock music, you will feel an honest connection to him.

He just released a new album called "You're Not Alone." It's his first in almost a decade. It's got a message of inspiration - sometimes delivered in song, sometimes in spoken word and Andrew reveals a lot of himself in the record, too. This month he kicks off a huge tour with dates all over the world.

Andrew talks with Jesse about being compared to Mister Rogers, what he has been doing since his last album, and why sometimes he feels like Sisyphus - a character from Greek mythology forced to forever to roll a boulder up a mountain only to see it fall back down every time he reaches the top.

Click here to listen to Andrew W.K.'s interview on YouTube.


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Bill Hader on his new HBO TV series "Barry"

You know Bill Hader from his time on Saturday Night Live. He was kind of an impressions guy - he did a mean Vincent Price. His most famous character was Stefon, from the Weekend Update sketches. He left the show in 2013 and went on to perform in movies like "Trainwreck," "Inside Out," and the smash hit "Sausage Party." Along with Fred Armisen, he also starred in the IFC show "Documentary Now!."

His latest project is an HBO TV show called "Barry." Hader stars as the show's title character, Barry Berkman. Barry's an ex-marine turned low rent hitman in Ohio, turned aspiring actor in Los Angeles.

Bill tells Jesse about working as a production assistant when he first came out to Los Angeles, the influence his parents had on his taste in film, and the struggle he had to project his voice.

Click here to listen to Bill Hader's interview on YouTube.


Photo: www.vanmorrison.com/music

The Outshot: Van Morrison's live album "It's Too Late to Stop Now"

Van Morrison doesn't really like to perform live, but there certainly was a time when he was great at it and it's on tape. "It's Too Late to Stop Now" was Van Morrison's first live record. He taped it across three months of touring in 1973. It's partly the totally revolutionary stuff he was making in the early 70s and it's partly a fond, almost nostalgic goodbye to the great songs he sang with his first band, Them, in the 60s.

Click here to listen to Jesse's Outshot on Van Morrison's "It's Too Late to Stop Now" on YouTube.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Padma Lakshmi and Laurie Kilmartin

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Bullseye
Guests: 
Padma Lakshmi
Guests: 
Laurie Kilmartin

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Ilya S. Savenok /Getty Images

Padma Lakshmi on her childhood in India, Top Chef, and her book The Encyclopedia of Herbs & Spices

Padma Lakshmi has gone through many career changes during her time in the public eye. She began her career as a model turned actress, then became a writer, and now hosts TV’s Top Chef on Bravo. She has written two cookbooks, a memoir, and now The Encyclopedia of Herbs & Spices.
Padma and Jesse talk about cultural differences she had to reckon with growing up between India and the United States, her role on Top Chef, and her new book The Encyclopedia of Herbs & Spices.

Click here to listen to Padma Lakshmi's interview on YouTube!

This interview originally aired in November of 2016


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Laurie Kilmartin on parenthood, and losing her father

Comedian and writer Laurie Kilmartin is probably best known as one of the finalists on the 7th season of Last Comic Standing. She has also written 2 books and has been nominated for a Primetime Emmy award. When Laurie's 83 year old father was diagnosed with cancer she had to take time off from her dream job as a staff writer on Conan O’Brian’s late night show. She flew up to visit her father in Northern California as much as she could. During the months of her father's declining health, she took to Twitter writing jokes about her experience of losing a parent to cancer.

She talks to Jesse about her comedy special called 45 Jokes About My Dead Dad. She gets candid about what it’s like to lose a parent and how instrumental Twitter was in coming to grips during the process.

You can buy her special here. And her new book Dead People Suck is available now.

Click here to listen to Laurie Kilmartin's interview on YouTube!

This interview originally aired in January of 2017

The Outshot: The Simpsons move to Cypress Creek

This week, Jesse tells us what an almost 20 year old episode of The Simpsons has to do with Silicon Valley, and why we should care.

Click here to listen to Jesse's Outshot on YouTube!

This segment originally aired in January of 2017

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Forest Whitaker and Armando Iannucci

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Bullseye
Guests: 
Forest Whitaker
Guests: 
Armando Iannucci

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Forest Whitaker on playing Desmond Tutu in his new movie "The Forgiven"

Forest Whitaker has been acting for over thirty years now and has won award after award including the Academy Award for best actor for his role as Idi Amin in "The Last King of Scotland." He has a knack for taking huge figures from history and portraying them as complex, fascinating, and sometimes really fragile people. He played Charlie Parker in "Bird." He played Cecil Gaines, the White House butler in "The Butler." Now, he's starring as Archbishop Desmond Tutu in the new film "The Forgiven," directed by Roland Joffe, who also made the classic 1984 film "The Killing Fields."

"The Forgiven" takes place in South Africa, just after apartheid. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission is in full swing- holding public and private testimony from the victims and perpetrators of past wrongs. Archbishop Tutu was the chairman of the commission, appointed by Nelson Mandela himself.

Whitaker chats with Jesse about Tutu's struggle to love the most heinous of criminals and how he himself struggles to love people that have hurt him. He talks about the origin of his movie "Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai" and what he learned about acting while playing the title role. He also explains why he stands by his movie "Battlefield Earth" - despite the many haters ready to poke fun about how bad the film was.

Click here to listen to Forest Whitaker's interview on YouTube.


Photo: Tara Ziemba/Getty Images

Armando Iannucci on his new movie "The Death of Stalin"

Armando Iannucci is a writer and director who created the HBO TV series "Veep," which has won seventeen Emmy Awards. He also created the BBC political comedy "The Thick of It," which later spun off into the move "In the Loop." He specializes in finding comedy in broken political systems and the bureaucrats who run them. He's found most of his material in the people who run democracies - UK cabinet ministers and presidential wannabes.

His latest project is called "The Death of Stalin." The film is set in Russia in 1953. Josef Stalin is dying from a cerebral hemorrhage and there's a power struggle brewing among members of his advising committee. He says the film is about five terrible people who pretty much all think they're fighting the good fight. The characters are all classic Iannucci: they're ambitious, chaotic and all deeply insecure. They betray one another at every turn, then feign concern and friendship when it's politically convenient.

He'll talks to Jesse about how this new movie took him out of his comfort zone, the fascinating stories he gathered from survivors of Stalin's regime, and why doing satire nowadays is harder than ever.

Click here to listen to Armando Iannucci's interview on YouTube.


Photo: Joe Brusky via Flickr Creative Commons

The Outshot: "The Coup"

Oakland's "The Coup" stand out among the greats of hip-hop's golden age of the late 80's and early 90's. They are standard bearers of that period's mix of politics, humanity, and humor.

Click here to listen to Jesse's Outshot on The Coup on YouTube.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Rachel Bloom, and the co-creators of Netflix's 'One Day at a Time'

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Show: 
Bullseye
Guests: 
Rachel Bloom
Guests: 
Gloria Calderon Kellett
Guests: 
Mike Royce

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


Photo: Mark Davis/Getty Images

Rachel Bloom on her love of musical theater and gaining confidence in Hollywood.

Rachel Bloom is a comedian whose humor often involves her bursting into song. She embraces the classic tropes of the Hollywood musical comedy adding her own contemporary twist on her CW show, Crazy Ex-Girlfriend. The show has earned her a Golden Globe and a Critics Choice Award.

A veteran of the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater, Bloom has also worked on television shows Allen Gregory and Robot Chicken. But it was her absurdist and hilarious musical videos that first brought her to the industry's attention. The video for her song, Fuck Me, Ray Bradbury went viral and earned Bloom a Hugo Award nomination. She has released two albums including Please Love Me andSuck It, Christmas!!! (A Chanukah Album).

Rachel Bloom sat down with Jesse to talk about her love for musical theater, gaining self-confidence in Hollywood and the logistics involved in being lifted in the air in a giant pretzel.

Episodes of Crazy Ex-Girlfriend can seen on Hulu and at CWTV.com.

This interview originally aired in June of 2016.


Photo: Jesse Thorn

Gloria Calderon Kellett and Mike Royce on their new show One Day At A Time

Gloria Calderon Kellett has been in show business as a writer, producer, and actor for almost two decades. She began her career writing on Andy Richter’s show Quintuplets. She also worked on How I Met Your Mother and Rules of Engagement. When Norman Lear, the legendary TV producer approached her about doing a reboot of One Day at a Time - his 1970s hit sitcom - she jumped at the chance.

She was joined by Mike Royce, a veteran TV producer of shows like Everybody Love Raymond and Men of a Certain Age, and Gloria. The two tell Jesse about how they began to conceptualize the new show, how Gloria avoided being being labeled as the "latina writer" during her career, and how they approached writing about marginalized communities in a sitcom format.

You can watch the reboot of the Norman Lear classic One Day At A Time by streaming it on Netflix.

This interview originally aired in January of 2017.

The Outshot: Popstar

Jesse explains why he loves a movie that aspires to be nothing more than silly, goofy and funny.

This segment originally aired in June of 2016.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: David Oyelowo and Heather Graham

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Bullseye
Guests: 
David Oyelowo
Guests: 
Heather Graham

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in iTunes or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.


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David Oyelowo on his history as a Shakespearean actor, film star, and his decision to move to the US

David Oyelowo's breakout performance was playing Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in 2014's "Selma." He got a Golden Globe nomination for that role and since then, he's become one of Hollywood's most sought-after celebrities. He stars in the new goofy, action comedy "Gringo," alongside Charlize Theron and Joel Edgerton. It's out in theatres this week.

In "Gringo," Oyelowo plays a middle manager at a pharmaceutical company that wants to get into the medical marijuana business. He's sent to Mexico to work on developing the drugs and that's where he gets sucked into the underground drug trade. Then more and more chaos ensues.

Oyelowo was born in Britain and is of Nigerian heritage - Nigerian royalty in fact. He and his family spent some time in Lagos when he was a kid. He says that having lived in two very different worlds at such a young age shaped his ability to code switch, which in turn improved his ability as an actor. He began his career as a classically trained stage theater actor who cut his teeth at the Royal Shakespeare Company in London. Some of his most notable films include "Queen of Katwe," "A United Kingdom," and Disney's latest "A Wrinkle in Time."

He talks to Jesse about his decision to move from the UK to the United States, why he knows more about American history than Nigerian history, and why some roles that require him to stay in character even after the camera stops rolling means he can't go home and be around his kids. He also shares some of his thoughts about one of the most outrageous characters he ever played on the short-lived HBO show "The No. 1 Ladies' Detective Agency."

Click here to listen to David Oyelowo's interview on YouTube.


Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images

Heather Graham on her debut as writer and director in her latest film "Half Magic"

We all know Heather Graham as an actress whose career has spanned over 30 years and starred in smash hits like "Swingers," "Drugstore Cowboy," "Boogie Nights" and "Twin Peaks." In her new movie "Half Magic," Graham is expanding her skills as a writer and director. She also stars in the film as Honey - an aspiring show business development executive that starts out as the assistant to an action film star.

"Half Magic" is a comedy, but it's also one that speaks to the current #MeToo moment. It highlights the struggle for female artists to make movies about women. It's filled with plenty of outrageous sexist lines that Graham drew from personal experience.

Graham also talks to Jesse about how not popular she was in high school. She described herself as awkward and geeky - never the one to be asked out on a date. She gained confidence auditioning and landing parts in school plays. She also shares the mistakes she made in her first go at writing and directing and talks about what she will do differently in those roles going forward.

Click here to listen to Heather Graham's interview on YouTube.

The Outshot: "Handsome"

Standup comic and "Curb Your Enthusiasm" actor Jeff Garlin wrote, directed and stars in the Netflix movie "Handsome." It's a detective story that's sort of like Columbo. It's funny, but also has a good amount of interactions that are thrillingly and modestly human.

Click here to hear Jesse's Outshot on YouTube.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: The Breeders' Kim Deal and Raoul Peck

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Guests: 
Kim Deal
Guests: 
Raoul Peck

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The Breeder's Kim Deal on their new album "All Nerve"

Kim Deal got her start as a professional musician after responding to a classified ad in the back of a local newspaper in Boston. Out of that exchange, she and three new friends formed The Pixies. The group became indie rock tastemakers, but they never produced a real chart topping hit. But during what ended up being a 10+ year hiatus for the band, Deal formed The Breeders. And Kim had a hit: "Cannoball" was a song she wrote for their 1993 album "Last Splash," which made it to the US Billboard Hot 100 and got constant play on MTV.

Kim still lives in Dayton, Ohio, her hometown. There she honed her skills singing and playing acoustic guitar with her sister. She tells Jesse about the music scene in Dayton, how unintended her success was, and what it felt like the first moment she realized that she had written a song that people wanted to dance to. Kim also talks about bringing The Breeders back together for their latest album to be released this week. "All Nerve" will be their first release in nearly ten years.

Click here to listen to Kim Deal's interview on YouTube.

Photo: Magnus Norden/Flickr Creative Commons

Raoul Peck on his latest movie "The Young Karl Marx"

Raoul Peck is a seriously successful serious filmmaker. The Haitian born director was nominated for an Academy Award last year for best documentary for his film "I Am Not Your Negro" about writer James Baldwin. In his latest scripted film "The Young Karl Marx," Peck was faced with a unique challenge: how to write a compelling story about the origin of a theory. Seven hours of screenplay, and ten years later, Peck tells Jesse about what went into bringing to life the personal tale of one of the most important thinkers in modern history - a figure who Pecks says wrote more about money while spending so much time living without it.

Peck himself lived a lot of his life struggling financially. He says he made the choice to never compromise his art in order to just to earn a living. This unwavering focus, he says, had a lot to do with growing up under a dictatorship in Haiti where there was no opportunity to think of accumulating wealth, buying a big house, or owning a car because all that could be so easily taken away.

Click here to listen to Raoul Peck's interview on YouTube.

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The Outshot: Curtis Mayfield

And finally, on the Outshot, soul musician and "Superfly" singer/songwriter Curtis Mayfield blended gospel, and black power on "Curtis," one of his most underrated records.

Click here to listen to Jesse's Outshot on YouTube.

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: Laurie Metcalf, Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez

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Bullseye
Guests: 
Laurie Metcalf
Guests: 
Kristen Anderson-Lopez
Guests: 
Robert Lopez

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in Apple Podcasts or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.

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First time Academy Award nominee Laurie Metcalf on her long career in theatre and television

You probably know Laurie Metcalf from her role as Roseanne's sister, Jackie, in the TV Sitcom Roseanne. Over the course of nine seasons, Laurie's portrayal of Jackie was warm and kind-hearted but a tad bit neurotic and always on edge. Laurie won two Emmys for that role on Roseanne. Before her career in television Laurie got her start in theater as a founding member of the legendary Steppenwolf Theater Company in Chicago. At the Steppenwolf she worked with the likes of John Malkovich, Terry Kinney and Gary Sinise.

This year, she's up for the best supporting actress Oscar for her role in Lady Bird. It's her first ever nomination for an Oscar. In Lady Bird she plays Marion McPherson, the mother of Christine "Lady Bird" McPherson. The McPhersons live in Sacramento and the whole movie is set in 2002. It's almost like a period piece from the Bush years. As "Lady Bird" approaches the end of her high school career their relationship is tested. The film examines their mother-daughter dynamic in a very realistic way -- it's messy, it's complicated, but there's also a lot of motherly love involved even if Marion doesn't exactly show it.

Jesse talks with Laurie about her long career and the parallels between her life and the mother she plays in Lady Bird. Plus, Laurie talks about what it was like to be reunited with the cast of Roseanne for the new television reboot after more than 20 years.

You can see Laurie Metcalf in upcoming redition of Edward Albee's Three Tall Women this spring on Broadway. And Lady Bird is still playing in select theaters.

Click here to listen to this interview on the Bullseye YouTube page!

Photo: Disney/ABC Television Group

Songwriting power couple Kristen Anderson-Lopez & Robert Lopez on writing Oscar nominated songs

Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez have written dozens of songs for movie and TV. Together the married couple have won award after award for their co-written songs. You've certainly heard the song they co-wrote called "Let It Go" from Disney's Frozen. The song was huge success. The theatrical version of the song reached #5 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song also won an Academy Award for Best Original Song in 2014 and a Grammy in 2015 for Best Song Written for Visual Media.

Robert's also written music for The Book of Mormon, Avenue Q, Scrubs and more. He's actually one of only 12 people to win an Emmy, Grammy, Oscar and Tony Award. Kristen and Robert are up for another Oscar this year -- this time for the co-written song "Remember Me" from Disney's Coco.

They talk to Jesse about the process behind writing that song, how they managed to sneak in adult jokes in children's songs, and how they find time in their busy schedules to be good parents, too. Plus, Jesse asked them about the first song they co-wrote together called "The Wide, Wide World," which is a song from Bear in the Big Blue House a television show from the early 2000's that aired on Playhouse Disney.

You don't want to miss it, the song is sung by a gang of puppet animals including a bear, a green lemur, and two purple otters. They had to rewrite the song about five times because they couldn't quite get the otter jokes right!

Click here to listen to this interview on the Bullseye YouTube page!

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn: David Wain and Belle and Sebastian's Stuart Murdoch

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Bullseye
Guests: 
David Wain
Guests: 
Stuart Murdoch

New to Bullseye? Subscribe to our podcast in Apple Podcasts or with your favorite podcatcher to make sure you automatically get the newest episode every week.

Photo: Jesse Thorn

David Wain on his new Netflix film "A Futile and Stupid Gesture"

David Wain got his first big break very early on in his life as a co-founder of the MTV sketch comedy show "The State." He then went on to direct "Role Models" and the cult classic "Wet Hot American Summer," but the transition from hit network television show to popular movie director was neither clear nor direct. For a long time after "The State," Wain was down on his luck - he didn't have another job and was not being asked to work on anything else. Wain tells Jesse about his time in therapy and how that helped him plan his next move toward filmmaking, which ultimately, led him to where he is today.

His latest Netflix movie "A Futile and Stupid Gesture," is about the successful, yet tragic life of Wain's own comedic hero Doug Kenney. Kenney founded The National Lampoon magazine and made the movies "Animal House" and "Caddyshack" - two movies that had huge impacts on fans of comedy everywhere, including Wain.

Click here to hear the interview on YouTube!

Photo: Kmeron via Flickr Creative Commons

Stuart Murdoch of Belle and Sebastian on his latest EPs "How to Solve Our Human Problems"

The last installment of indie pop band Belle and Sebastian's EP trilogy "How to Solve Our Human Problems" is out this week. Stuart Murdoch is the band's founder and lead vocalist. Belle and Sebastian's records are on hundreds of top 10 lists and their second album "If You're Feeling Sinister" is considered by many critics to be one of the best albums of the '90's.

Murdoch admits that when he was young becoming a musician was never part of his life plan. His path to founding Belle and Sebastian actually began with an illness. In the 1980's, Murdoch first discovered his continued struggle with chronic fatigue syndrome. He dropped out of college, spent a lot of time in the hospital, and moved back in with his parents. It was there in the quiet moments that he began to write tunes on his piano. On the suggestion of his doctor, he joined a class for unemployed musicians where he met Stuart David, Belle and Sebastian's co-founder.

Murdoch also talks with Jesse about his passion for baseball, why many of the songs in the latest EPs are ones your uncle would want to dance to at a wedding, and how his interest in Buddhism and meditation play a part in the overall concept of "How to Solve Our Human Problems."

Click here to hear the interview on YouTube!

Bob Levey / Stringer / Getty Images

The Outshot: Scarface

And finally, on the Outshot, Houston rapper Scarface has shaped his career by directly facing the trauma and consequences of gang violence, not just the desire for power and fear that fuel it.

Click here to hear the interview on YouTube!

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