food

Molecular Gastronomy on The Grid

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I liked this segment we did for The Grid because I got to:
A) Act dumb.
B) Use a rubber lobster.

That's sort of how I judge these things.

The actual molecular gastronomy kit seemed kind of cool, though the packets of crazy chemicals all looked exactly the same, which gave me pause.

Anyway, The Grid: Thursdays at 7:45 on IFC.

Trader Joe's Reviews

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If you grew up going to "traditional" grocery stores, the myriad of unique products at Trader Joe's specialty super markets can be a bit perplexing. Lucky for you, I go there 6-9 times a week and I'm happy to share my thoughts on their wide array of comestibles.

Middle Eastern Flat Bread - It costs a bit more than the traditional pita pocket, but send one of these fluffy little buddies on a pre-dip ride in the toaster oven and get ready for a snack time freak-out.

Sugar Plums - I was told that these might be associated with some sort of "fairie". Well, I don't usually like to associate with "magic" or "majicks" so when I'm biting into one of these juicy little beauties, I just try to think good, Christian thoughts.

Crumbled Salem Blue Cheese - Eating this food is like a punch in the penis. I mean, like a soft, tender punch from a lover. Like an erotic punch based on trust. This is a positive review.

Banana Nut Crunch Cereal - A real cluster fuck. Of cereal.

The Irish Breakfast Milkshake

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I'm a milkshake enthusiast, always have been, so when I saw a cookbook called "Thoroughly Modern Milkshakes" in a book catalog a few months ago, I made sure to ask for a review copy. After all, who knows when The Sound of Young America might turn into The Splendid Table?

The book is really lovely, and author Adam Reid includes tons of amazing milkshakes, from the simple to the absurd. Last night, I made a cucumber lemon mint shake, and that was after looking for a relatively simple recipe. I couldn't wrap my head around Sweet Corn & Basil or Blackberry Lavender.

My favorite shake I've made from the book so far was a very simple one -- one that I actually managed from stuff I had sitting around my house.

It's called The Irish Breakfast Milkshake. There are no bangers or fried potatoes in it -- it's actually a tea shake.

It's very simple to make.

You start by steeping four black tea bags in about four ounces of boiling water. Then take out (and squeeze out!) the bags, and refrigerate the super-tea you've made until it's cool (half an hour or so).

In the blender, mix your tea with about eight scoops of french vanilla ice cream and about an ounce of honey. Be sure to use a spatula to push it down and mix it up a bit between whooshes of the blender.

The vanilla ice cream and the complex tea flavor play so wonderfully together, and that lovely honey sweetness is a perfect crowning touch. Super easy, super delicious.

All hail Thoroughly Modern Milkshakes!

Doughnuts, Explained: Dr. Paul Mullins, author of "Glazed America: A History of the Doughnut" interviewed on The Sound of Young America

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Show: 
Bullseye


Paul Mullins is chair of the department of anthropology at Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis. His book, "Glazed America: A History of the Doughnut," explores the symbolism and history of America's favorite deep-fried dough circle.

Below: I recommend the sugar pucks... they're excellent.

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